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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Oakland in Alameda County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Evolution of a Marine Terminal

 
 
Evolution of a Marine Terminal Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, January 9, 2014
1. Evolution of a Marine Terminal Marker
Captions: Birdís-eye view 1893 (top, right); Howard Terminal – 1900 (center, right); Quay Wall, Municipal Dock No. 1 (bottom, right (l)); Grove Street Terminal – 1928 (bottom, right (r)); Weatherproof containers donít need protection from the elements. Modern marine terminals look like big parking lots. (top, center); Charles P. Howard Terminal – 1982 (bottom, center (l)); Howard Terminal – 1997 (bottom, center (r)); Quay wall under construction circa 1913. (sidebar, top); A remnant of the original quay wall can be seen west of the foot of Clay Street. (sidebar, bottom).
Inscription. Oaklandís waterfront has been rebuilt many times in response to changes in marine technology. In 1900 coal-laden schooners discharged their cargo into bunkers on Howard Terminalís pier. Dockside warehouses, known as transit sheds, held break-bulk cargo (such as bags of wheat) for the return trip. Longshoremen moved cargo between shore and vessels with hand trucks, shipboard derricks, and cargo nets. Finger piers reached out from the shore to deeper water. When shipbuilding transitioned from wind-powered wood hulls to fuel-powered steel hulls, the city built a quay wall along the shoreline west of Clay Street to provide deep-water berths for increasingly larger, deeper-draft vessels. Later, a paved wharf and several piers with transit sheds were added to the area. After the Port of Oakland was established in 1925, these municipal facilities were reconfigured as Grove Street Terminal, including a larger pier and u-shaped transit shed that served as the Portís headquarters from 1928 to 1966.
Containerization, introduced in Oakland in 1962, brought speed and standardization units to cargo handling. The Port bought the private Howard Terminal site in 1978, and built a modern container facility, Charles P. Howard Terminal, to replace outmoded break-bulk facilities.

sidebar on right

Constructed between 1910 and
Evolution of a Marine Terminal Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, January 9, 2014
2. Evolution of a Marine Terminal Marker
This marker is closest to the camera.
1914, the quay wall was a long bulkhead that measured forty feet from top to bottom, and tapered from twenty-two feet wide at its base to eighteen inches at the top. Because the quay wall was built inland from the shore, tons of soil were removed on the harbor side. Dredging created a berthing basin with a depth of 27 feet at low tide. Sediment placed on the shore side of the wall became a 150-foot-wide wharf.
 
Erected by Port of Oakland.
 
Location. 37° 47.705′ N, 122° 16.786′ W. Marker is in Oakland, California, in Alameda County. Marker can be reached from Clay Street near Water Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Oakland CA 94607, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Charles P. Howard Terminal (here, next to this marker); History of the Transbay Ferry (a few steps from this marker); USS Potomac (within shouting distance of this marker); The Port of Oakland (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Jack London (about 700 feet away); Oakland's First Wharf (about 700 feet away); Live Oak Lodge U.D (about 700 feet away); Origins of Oakland (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Oakland.
 
More about this marker. This marker
Port of Oakland Marine Terminal in the background image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, January 9, 2014
3. Port of Oakland Marine Terminal in the background
is located at the Oakland Ferry Terminal in Jack London Square.
 
Also see . . .  About the Port: History - Port of Oakland. Here the normally sedate Port Commissioner George Pardee, then mayor of Oakland, personally kicked down a fence that the Southern Pacific railroad, which once claimed exclusive ownership of Oakland's waterfront, had erected across Broadway in 1893. Finally, in 1906, the California Supreme Court ended the lengthy disputes by ruling in the city's favor. (Submitted on January 18, 2014, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceWaterways & Vessels
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on January 18, 2014, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 364 times since then and 37 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on January 18, 2014, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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