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Falls Church, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Falls Church

Vandalism and Renewal

 
 
The Falls Church Marker image. Click for full size.
September 7, 2013
1. The Falls Church Marker
Inscription. The Civil War dramatically affected this 1769 Anglican/Episcopal church that stands before you. The congregation disbanded as the war broke out, with some families fleeing the village. Confederate forces occupied the church in August and September 1861, followed by the Union army for the rest of the war.

Federal troops used the church as a hospital in 1862. The adjoining churchyard includes about twenty unmarked Union graves. Soldiers later used the church as a stable, removing the wooden flooring and bricks under some windows to allow horses access. Further damage occurred as soldiers collected souvenirs including the communion silver. By 1865, the church had been stripped of furnishings, and graffiti covered the walls. One Union soldier removed the baptismal font and asked the local postmistress to help him ship it home; instead, she hid it until the war ended. In 1866, the U.S. Army inexpertly repaired the church. The congregation formally reorganized in 1873 and elected a vestry that included former Federal soldiers who had moved to Falls Church. They helped in the rebuilding.

“Last Sunday I was down at Falls Church it is about two miles from where we had encamped. The Church is a brick building and about one hundred and thirty years old already. General Washington used to worship in it. Now the
The Falls Church Marker image. Click for full size.
September 7, 2013
2. The Falls Church Marker
soldiers use it to lay in at night while on Pickett. These splinters of wood I cut off the window shutters and sills. Keep them till I come home, then I can tell you all about the country, etc.” — Pvt. Noah A. Walmer, 127th Pennsylvania Infantry, letter to his family, Oct. 24, 1862

 
Erected by Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 38° 52.858′ N, 77° 10.325′ W. Marker is in Falls Church, Virginia. Marker is at the intersection of South Washington Street (County Route 237) and East Fairfax Street, on the right when traveling north on South Washington Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 115 E Fairfax Street, Falls Church VA 22046, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. New York Memorial Stone at Falls Church (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Falls Church (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Falls Church (within shouting distance of this marker); James Wren (within shouting distance of this marker);
The Falls Church image. Click for full size.
September 7, 2013
3. The Falls Church
Henry Fairfax (within shouting distance of this marker); To the Glory of God and in Honor of George Washington (within shouting distance of this marker); Town Hall (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Rolling Roads (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Falls Church.
 
More about this marker. The marker displays two photos and a sketch captioned Union soldiers outside the Falls Church - Courtesy National Archives and Records Administration, Union outpost, Falls Church, July 1, 1861 Courtesy Library of Congress, and Soldier graffiti in the church Courtesy Library of Congress.
 
Also see . . .  History of The Falls Church. From The Falls Church Episcopal (Submitted on March 3, 2014.) 
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.War, US Civil
 
Soldier Graffiti in the Church image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress - Historic American Buildings Survey
4. Soldier Graffiti in the Church
LOC/HABS photo reproduced on marker
Soldier Graffiti in the Church image. Click for full size.
Libarary of Congress - Historic American Buildings Survey
5. Soldier Graffiti in the Church
Sergeant C. W. (Wesley) Breese and others scribbled their names on the walls of the Falls Church. -- 22 year old Sgt. Breese died of fever on August 2, 1863 in a Washington hospital and is buried in the Military Asylum Cemetery.
Detail of LOC/HABS photo
Union Soldiers outside Falls Church image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 28, 2014
6. Union Soldiers outside Falls Church
Close-up of National Archives photo on marker
Union Outpost, Falls Church, July 1, 1861 image. Click for full size.
By Alfred R. Waud, 1861
7. Union Outpost, Falls Church, July 1, 1861
Alfred R. Waud's drawing of Thomkins Cavalry at Falls Church
LOC image reproduced on marker
You Are Here image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 28, 2014
8. You Are Here
Close-up of map on marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 3, 2014. This page has been viewed 736 times since then and 42 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on March 3, 2014.   4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on October 1, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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