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Sharpsburg in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Longstreet's Command

 
 
Longstreet's Command, September 17 Tablet image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2007
1. Longstreet's Command, September 17 Tablet
Inscription.
C.S.A.
Longstreet's Command.

Maj. Gen. James Longstreet, Commanding.
September 17, 1862.

Early in the day several brigades of this command were sent to the vicinity of the Dunkard Church in support of Jackson's Command.

At about 9:15 a.m. French's Division, and shortly thereafter Richardson's Division of Federal Infantry, assaulted the position occupied by a portion of this command at the Bloody Lane. The fighting at this point, which was of a desperate character, involving heavy losses on both sides, ceased early in the afternoon.

Between 1 and 3 p.m. the position of D.R. Jones' Division, covering the Burnside Bridge, was assaulted and finally carried by the Ninth Corps.

At about 3 p.m. Jones' Division, assisted by A.P. Hill's Division of Jackson's Command, succeeded in checking the advance of the enemy.
 
Erected by Antietam Battlefield Board. (Marker Number 304.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Antietam Campaign War Department Markers marker series.
 
Location. 39° 27.596′ N, 77° 44.546′ W. Marker is in Sharpsburg, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is on Boonsboro Pike (State Highway 34), on the right when traveling
Piper Farm image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 5, 2007
2. Piper Farm
Anderson's Division, of Longstreet's Command, after being driven from the Sunken Road, formed a defense around the Piper Farm. Mixed with portions of D.H. Hill's Division, these men, assisted by the artillery of the 3rd Company, Washington Artillery (Miller's Battery) and the Jeff Davis Artillery (Bondurant's Battery), managed to hold the Confederate center.
east. Touch for map. Located in a Confederate tablet cluster just to the west of the National Cemetery entrance, stop eleven of the driving tour of Antietam Battlefield. Marker is in this post office area: Sharpsburg MD 21782, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Longstreet's Command (here, next to this marker); Reserve Artillery, Longstreet's Command (here, next to this marker); Hood's Division, Longstreet's Command (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Longstreet's Command (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Longstreet's Command (a few steps from this marker); D.R. Jones' Division, Longstreet's Command (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named D.R. Jones' Division, Longstreet's Command (a few steps from this marker); Evans' Brigade, Longstreet's Command (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sharpsburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. Antietam Battlefield. National Park Service site. (Submitted on April 20, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Longstreet's Command, Army of Northern Virginia. Summarizing the Antietam Campaign in his official
Confederate Tablet Cluster near the Entrance to the Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
3. Confederate Tablet Cluster near the Entrance to the Cemetery
From left to right these are: Longstreet's Command, September 14-16 (number 303); Longstreet's Command, September 17 (number 304); Reserve Artillery, Longstreet's Command, September 15-16 (number 305); Hood's Division, September 15-16 (number 309); and Reserve Artillery, Hood's Division, September 15-16 (number 311). Three additional tablets stand to the right of these.
report, Longstreet wrote, The name of every officer, non-commissioned officer, and private who has shared in the toils and privations of this campaign should be mentioned. In one month these troops had marched over 200 miles, upon little more than half rations, and fought nine battles and skirmishes killed, wounded, and captured nearly as many men as we had in our ranks, besides taking arms and other munitions of war in large quantities. (Submitted on April 20, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 20, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 597 times since then and 30 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on April 20, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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