Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Port Orford in Curry County, Oregon — The American West (Northwest)
 

Wreck of the Cottoneva

 
 
Wreck of the Cottoneva Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Wilson, June 11, 2010
1. Wreck of the Cottoneva Marker
Inscription. On Feb. 10, 1937, winds over 74 M.P.H. caused the 190 foot steam schooner "Cottoneva" to run aground at Battle Rock. It was in port loading lumber. The captain and all 26 seamen were rescued by the Coast Guard crew using a breeches body. The Cottoneva was constructed in 1917, and originally christened the "Frank D. Stout." Only the propeller remains.
 
Location. 42° 44.589′ N, 124° 29.568′ W. Marker is in Port Orford, Oregon, in Curry County. Marker is on U.S. 101, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. This marker is located at the Port Orford Visitor Center just south of Battle Rock. There is ample parking with access to a beautiful crescent beach and a stunning view along the coast to the south. Marker is in this post office area: Port Orford OR 97465, United States of America.
 
More about this marker. This marker is a wooden board supported by two wooden posts.
 
Categories. DisastersWaterways & Vessels
 
Wreck of the Cottoneva - Beach image. Click for full size.
By Larry Wilson, September 15, 2007
2. Wreck of the Cottoneva - Beach
Wreck of the Cottoneva Propeller image. Click for full size.
By Larry Wilson, July 19, 2012
3. Wreck of the Cottoneva Propeller
Wreck of the Cottoneva - Battle Rock image. Click for full size.
By Larry Wilson, September 15, 2007
4. Wreck of the Cottoneva - Battle Rock
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 24, 2014, by Larry Wilson of Wareham, Massachusetts. This page has been viewed 259 times since then and 17 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on April 24, 2014, by Larry Wilson of Wareham, Massachusetts. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement