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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
La Cueva in Mora County, New Mexico — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

La Cueva National Historic District

 
 
La Cueva National Historic District Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 21, 2014
1. La Cueva National Historic District Marker
Inscription. This ranching community was established by Vicente Romero in the early 1850s. The grist mill was built in the 1870s. Its proximity to Fort Union and the Santa Fe Trail helped the ranch develop into one of the region’s most important commercial centers. The mill, mercantile buildings, two-story residence and San Rafael Church were designated a National Historic District in 1973.
 
Location. 35° 56.466′ N, 105° 15.005′ W. Marker is in La Cueva, New Mexico, in Mora County. Marker is at the intersection of State Road 518 and State Road 442 on State Road 518. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Rainsville NM 87736, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 4 other markers are within 14 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. La Cueva Mill (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Curanderas — Women Who Heal (approx. 5.4 miles away); Strike Valleys (approx. 8.5 miles away); Hermit’s Peak (approx. 14 miles away).
 
Regarding La Cueva National Historic District. The Romero-La Cueva Ranch is now the Salman Ranch. All of the land and buildings of this historic district is private property. Inquire at the general store for permission to walk the grounds.
 
Also see . . .
La Cueva National Historic District Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 21, 2014
2. La Cueva National Historic District Marker
 The History of the Romero- Salman Ranch. Excerpt: “Vincente Romero was a man of vision. The Acequia, which now flows past the Cafe and the Nursery and nourishes the raspberry fields, was dug under his supervision, and is a brillant engineering feat. It feed numerous lakes on his land which from which he grew crops. He established the early water rights for the property, some dating back to 1835. The property was left to his only son who, rumor has it, was educated at Princeton and came back to manage the Ranch on the death of his father in 1881. Phillip lived at a home still occupied on the Salman property, and it is aptly named the Romero House. Records from the GRIST MILL attest to the many orders from Fort Union, and even at that early date, the Government was late in paying its bills. Letters asking for late payment are numerous. The Romero Ranch was sold off in pieces, and it was Colonel Wm. Salman who reunited those disperate holding, thus reconstituting the original Romero Land Grant.” (Submitted on April 28, 2014.) 
 
Categories. AgricultureIndustry & Commerce
 
La Cueva Mill image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 21, 2014
3. La Cueva Mill
A Mercantile Building Next to the Mill image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 21, 2014
4. A Mercantile Building Next to the Mill
Salman Ranch Store image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 21, 2014
5. Salman Ranch Store
Salman Ranch is known for its raspberries. There are some great treats inside.
San Rafael Church image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 21, 2014
6. San Rafael Church
Vicente Romero House at La Cueva Rancho image. Click for full size.
By Richard Federici, NPS
7. Vicente Romero House at La Cueva Rancho
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 27, 2014, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 319 times since then and 60 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on April 27, 2014, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   5, 6. submitted on April 28, 2014, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   7. submitted on September 19, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. Photos of the residence • Can you help?
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