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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Joppatowne in Harford County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Gilmor's Raid

Burning the Gunpowder River Bridge

 
 
Gilmor's Raid Marker image. Click for full size.
By Randy Meldron, May 16, 2014
1. Gilmor's Raid Marker
Burning the Gunpowder River Bridge
Inscription. On July 6, 1864, Confederate cavalryman cross the Potomac River into Maryland as part of a 12,000 man force under Gen. Jubal A. Early, who planned to attack lightly defended Washington, DC., and draw off part of the Union army menacing Richmond and Petersburg. union Gen. Lew Wallace's force, however, delayed Early at the Monocacy River on July 9. Early Ordered Gen. Bradley T. Johnson's cavalry brigade to cut off Baltimore and Washington from the north, then to free 14,000 Confederate prisoners at Point Lookout, Maryland.

After destroying the Northern Central Railroad bridge in Cockeysville, Johnson Detached Maj. Harry Gilmor with 135 troopers to destroy the Philadelphia, Wilmington and Baltimore Railroad drawbridge over Gunpowder River near Magnolia Station and Joppa. Gilmor arrived at the Station at 8:30 A.M. on July 11 and captured the stopped northbound train from Baltimore. The engineer disabled the controls and fled. Unable to operate the train, Gilmor burned it.

The next train arrived an hour later and fell into Gilmor's hands along with Union Gen. William B. Franklin. Gilmor detrained the passengers, set the train on fire and backed it onto the Gunpowder River bridge. Although the Union gunboat Juanita and detachments from Co. F, 159th Ohio National Guard, and the Delaware Volunteers were guarding the bridge,
Gilmor's Raid Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 27, 2014
2. Gilmor's Raid Marker
they could not stop Gilmor. As the flames from the burning train engulfed the bridge, the Federal soldiers leaped into the river. a few soldiers uncoupled two cars and rolled them to safety, but soon the draw span collapsed and several cars plunged into the water.

(captions)
(lower left) Train Burning at Magnolia Station, Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper (1864)
(upper right) "Destruction of the Bridge Over Gunpowder Creek," Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial History of the Civil War (1866)
(lower right) Harry Gilmor Courtesy Dave Marks
 
Erected by Maryland Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Maryland Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 39° 23.771′ N, 76° 20.906′ W. Marker is in Joppatowne, Maryland, in Harford County. Marker can be reached from Kearney Drive south of Latimer Road. Touch for map. Marker is located in the back of Mariner Point Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 100 Kearney Drive, Joppa MD 21085, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Rumsey Mansion (approx. one mile away); Joppa Town (approx. 1.1 miles away); Gunpowder River
Train Burnng at Magnolia Station<br><i>Leslies's Illustated Newspaper</i> (1864) image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 27, 2014
3. Train Burnng at Magnolia Station
Leslies's Illustated Newspaper (1864)
Close-up of image on marker
(approx. 2.2 miles away); “Long Calm” (approx. 3.4 miles away); Union of Brother and Sisters of Fordís Asbury Lodge No. 1 (approx. 3.4 miles away); Franklinville (approx. 4.1 miles away); “Whitemarsh” (approx. 4.4 miles away); Gov. William Paca (approx. 4.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Joppatowne.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
"Destruction of the Bridge Over Gunpowder Creek," image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 27, 2014
4. "Destruction of the Bridge Over Gunpowder Creek,"
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial History of the Civil War (1866)
Close-up of image on marker
The Railroad Bridge over the Gunpowder River image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 27, 2014
5. The Railroad Bridge over the Gunpowder River
Gilmor's Raid<br>Burning of PW&B Trains at Magnolia Station & the Gunpowder River Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 27, 2014
6. Gilmor's Raid
Burning of PW&B Trains at Magnolia Station & the Gunpowder River Bridge
Baltimore a House Divided


On July 6, 1864 the Washington Baltimore Campaign began when Confederate Cavalry crossed the Potomac River into Maryland. General Early was over-all commander of the Army of the Valley. The Battle of Monocacy took place on July 9, 1864. Just before the battle Gen. Early sent Bradley T. Johnson's cavalry brigade on a daring raid to cut of Baltimore and Washington from the north and then free prisoners at Point Lookout, Maryland.

After the Destruction (of the) North Central Railroad bridge in Cockysville, General Johnson divided his forces and sent Major Harry Gilmor with 135 troopers east to destroy the Philadelphia, Wilmington & Baltimore Railroad Line at Magnolia Station near Joppa and the Gunpowder River.

Gilmor arrived at 8:30 a.m. on July 11th at Magnolia Station, just in time to capture the stopped northbound morning train from Baltimore. The engineer saw him coming, disabled the controls, and fled. Unable to operate the train, Gilmor decided to burn it on the track at the Station.

The next train arrived one hour later without warning of Confederates. It fell into Gilmor's hands along with Major General William B. Franklin. After detraining all passengers, the train was set (on) fire and backed out onto the Gunpowder River Bridge. Guarding the bridge was the Gunboat Juniata and a detachment of men from Company F 159th Ohio National Guard & Delaware Volunteers.

As the burning train engulfed the bridge, the soldiers were forced to leap into the river. Two cars managed to be uncoupled and rolled to safety by federal soldiers. Finally the draw span went out ands several cars crashed down into the water.

Civil War Trails Marker inside the Mariner's Point Park Visitors' Center.
Gilmor's Raid Marker<br>Inside the Mariner's Point Visitors Center image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 27, 2014
7. Gilmor's Raid Marker
Inside the Mariner's Point Visitors Center
Mariner's Point Sign image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 27, 2014
8. Mariner's Point Sign
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 16, 2014. This page has been viewed 624 times since then and 106 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on May 16, 2014, by Randy Meldron of Joppa, Maryland.   2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on August 28, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. Wide shot of marker and its surroundings. • Can you help?
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