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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Chester in Chesterfield County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Howlett Line Gun Position

The Bermuda Hundred Campaign

 
 
Howlett Line Gun Position Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, May 24, 2014
1. Howlett Line Gun Position Marker
Inscription. The ground you are standing on would have been a very dangerous place from May of 1864 until the fall of Petersburg in April of 1865. In front of you is one of the many gun positions that the Confederates used to protect the Howlett Line. This position juts out from the trenches on either side of it. This allowed the guns here to sweep the left, right and front with deadly fire.

Just 100 yards in front of this site was the Confederate picket line. A mere 600 yards away was the opposing Federal picket line. Beyond that the Federal cannons at Fort McConihe and Fort Carpenter were only 1,000 and 1,400 yards away respectively.

A Confederate attack launched from this area would have to capture both of those outlying forts in order to make it to the main Federal line approximately 1 mile from here. A Federal attack would have to push through the Confederate picket line and then chop their way through three lines of obstructions, all while under heavy fire from the guns here and Confederate riflemen behind well prepared earthworks.

The photos to the right were taken in Hanover County. They show the Confederate line overlooking the North Anna River after being occupied by Federal troops. While not taken here, they give a very good visual representation of what life in the Howlett Line would have looked like for
Howlett Line Gun Position Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, May 24, 2014
2. Howlett Line Gun Position Marker
the typical Confederate soldier.

(captions)
The gun position in front of you would have looked very similar to the one in this photo.
Makeshift shelters in the trenches.
This sign was sponsored by Jessica and Harry Thaete, Coronado, CA
 
Erected 2014 by Chesterfield County and the Blue & Gray Education Society.
 
Location. 37° 20.677′ N, 77° 23.527′ W. Marker is in Chester, Virginia, in Chesterfield County. Marker can be reached from Old Bermuda Hundred Road east of Ramblewood Drive, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Located in Ware Bottom Church Battlefield Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1600 Old Bermuda Hundred Rd, Chester VA 23831, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Construction of the Howlett Line (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); A Bomb Proof Church ? (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Battle of Ware Bottom Church (approx. 0.2 miles away); Parker's Battery (approx. 0.3 miles away); Remembrance (approx. 0.3 miles away); Howlett Line (approx. 0.4 miles away); Boy Company (approx. 0.4 miles away); a different marker also named Parkerís Battery (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Chester.
 
North Anna River, Virginia. Interior view of Confederate redoubt commanding Chesterfield bridge. image. Click for full size.
By Timothy H. O'Sullivan, May 25, 1864
3. North Anna River, Virginia. Interior view of Confederate redoubt commanding Chesterfield bridge.
Library of Congress [LC-B811- 755]
North Anna River, Va. Federal troops occupying line of breastworks on the north bank. image. Click for full size.
By Timothy H. O'Sullivan, May 25, 1864
4. North Anna River, Va. Federal troops occupying line of breastworks on the north bank.
Library of Congress [LC-B811- 756]
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 25, 2014, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 477 times since then and 44 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on May 25, 2014, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.   3, 4. submitted on June 1, 2014, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.
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