Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lynchburg, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Professor Frank Trigg

(1850-1933)

 
 
Professor Frank Trigg Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, May 26, 2014
1. Professor Frank Trigg Marker
Inscription. “Frank Trigg came into this world a slave and was buried a retired college president.” He was born in 1850 at the Governor's Mansion in Richmond, as his parents, Sarah and Frank Sr., served Governor John B. Floyd. At age 13 he lost an arm in a farming accident and his owner said “since he was no more good with his hands, he'd see how good he could be with his head.” His education took him to Hampton Institute where he graduated in 1873, one class year ahead of his friend, Booker T. Washington. They both shared a strong lifetime allegiance to Hampton, as well as to the industrial education movement.

In 1881 Trigg was appointed one of the first Negro teachers in the Lynchburg Public School system, serving 22 years and becoming the first Negro supervisor of Negro schools.

Other highlights of his professional career include:
• Principal of Morgan College Annex, Fairview Heights, Lynchburg (which was predecessor of Morgan State College in Baltimore).
• Principal of Princess Anne Academy in Baltimore (1902-1910) (which became Maryland State, then the University of Maryland Eastern Shore). Trigg Hall in the School of Agriculture honors Frank Trigg.
• Principle of Virginia Collegiate and Industrial Institute, Lynchburg (1910-1916).
• President of Bennett College, Greensboro,
Professor Frank Trigg Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher
2. Professor Frank Trigg Marker
N.C. (1917-1926).

After retiring at age 76, Frank and Ellen Trigg returned to Lynchburg to make their home at 1422 Prince Street. The Trigg family monument is on the bluff straight ahead near the fence.

Archives of the Library at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore
 
Location. 37° 24.942′ N, 79° 9.408′ W. Marker is in Lynchburg, Virginia. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Taylor Street and 4th Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 401 Taylor Street, Lynchburg VA 24501, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Court Street Baptist Church Tragedy (here, next to this marker); Lucy Mina Otey and the Ladie’s Relief Hospital (within shouting distance of this marker); Crippled Corps and V.M.I. Cadets Form Inner Defenses in Old City Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker); The Confederate Section (within shouting distance of this marker); Lynchburg, Virginia (within shouting distance of this marker); Lynchburg’s Confederate Surgeons (within shouting distance of this marker); Silas Green (within shouting distance of this marker); The Carl Porter Cato Rose Collection (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lynchburg.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .  Old City Cemetery. The oldest public cemetery in Virginia still in use today - central Virginia's most unique public garden. (Submitted on May 28, 2014.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansCemeteries & Burial SitesEducation
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 28, 2014, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 533 times since then and 26 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on May 28, 2014, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. Picture of the Trigg family monument. • Can you help?
Paid Advertisement