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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Columbia in Richland County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The North-South Streets in The City Of Columbia / Richardson Street

 
 
The North-South Streets in The City Of Columbia Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, April 2008
1. The North-South Streets in The City Of Columbia Marker
Inscription.
The North-South Streets in The City Of Columbia
The north-south streets, laid out in the two mile square of the orininal city of Columbia in 1786, were named (except for Assembly) for generals and officers who fought in the American Revolution. Most of these were native Americans, but one was the Polish Count Pulaski.

Richardson Street
Columbia's chief business street, Main, was first named Richardson Street, for Richard Richardson (1704-1780). This Virginia native settled in present Clarendon County; served in the "Snow Campaign" of 1775; was commissioned Brigadier General in 1778; was a member of the Commons House of Assembly, the First and Second Provincial Congresses, and First General Assembly. Six S.C. Governors are amoung his descendants.
 
Erected 1976 by Columbia Committee, National Society Colonial Dames Of America In The State Of S.C. A Richland County Bicentennial Project. (Marker Number 40-59.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the National Society of Colonial Dames of America marker series.
 
Location. 34° 0.075′ N, 81° 2.005′ W. Marker is in Columbia, South Carolina, in Richland County. Marker is at the
Richardson Street Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, April 18, 2008
2. Richardson Street Marker
intersection of Gervais Street (U.S. 1) and Main Street, on the right when traveling east on Gervais Street. Touch for map. Marker is at the north side of the Statehouse grounds. Marker is in this post office area: Columbia SC 29201, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. South Carolina Confederate Monument (a few steps from this marker); The East-West Streets In The City Of Columbia - Gervais Street (within shouting distance of this marker); Spanish-American War Veterans Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Benjamin Ryan Tillman (within shouting distance of this marker); George Washington (Statue) (within shouting distance of this marker); The State House of South Carolina (within shouting distance of this marker); Battleship Maine Memorial (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Robert E. Lee Memorial Highway (about 300 feet away); The State House (about 300 feet away); Palmetto Regiment (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Columbia.
 
Also see . . .
1. Welcome to the City of Columbia. Official website of the City of Columbia, SC. (Submitted on August 24, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Columbia, South Carolina. Columbia is the state capital and largest city in the U.S. state of South Carolina.
The North-South Streets in The City Of Columbia Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 25, 2011
3. The North-South Streets in The City Of Columbia Marker
(Submitted on August 24, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Casimir Pulaski. Casimir Pulaski of Ślepowron coat-of-arms (March 6, 1745 – October 11, 1779), was a Polish soldier, nobleman, and politician who has been called "the father of American cavalry". (Submitted on August 24, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. Gen. Richard Richardson - Find-a-Grave Memorial. The name of his early and university education has not been determined, but due to his respectable parentage and large family connections he most likely enrolled in Virginia University. (Submitted on August 24, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. South Carolina State Waltz: The Richard Richardson Waltz. GGeneral Richard Richardson (1704-1780) came, as a surveyor, from Virginia to settle in South Carolina in the colonial period. (Submitted on August 24, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

6. Snow Campaign. It was November, in 1775. Colonel Richard Richardson led his Camden regiment of South Carolina militia into the Back Country, the wilderness piedmont of the Appalachian mountains. (Submitted on August 24, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

7. The American Revolution in South Carolina: The Snow Campaign. The Spartan Regiment and other Patriots, under Col. Richard Richardson, set out to attack a Loyalist
Richardson Street Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, April 18, 2008
4. Richardson Street Marker
unit that had camped in Indian territory (present-day Greenville County) for safety. (Submitted on August 24, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Patriots & PatriotismRoads & VehiclesSettlements & SettlersWar, US Revolutionary
 
Richardson Street Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 25, 2011
5. Richardson Street Marker
Richardson Street Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 25, 2011
6. Richardson Street Marker
Richardson Street Marker, looking west along Gervais Street image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2011
7. Richardson Street Marker, looking west along Gervais Street
Per request of Photo of marker location
Casimir Pulaski<br>1745-1779 image. Click for full size.
By Jan Styka, circa 1920
8. Casimir Pulaski
1745-1779
Richard Richardson<br>1704-1780 image. Click for full size.
By By SC Revolution Patriot Leaders
9. Richard Richardson
1704-1780
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 30, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,014 times since then and 66 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on April 30, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   2. submitted on August 24, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   3. submitted on August 24, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   4. submitted on August 24, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   5, 6. submitted on August 24, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   7. submitted on August 24, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   8, 9. submitted on August 24, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. • Christopher Busta-Peck was the editor who published this page.
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