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Manchester in Carroll County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Manchester

Meade's Pipe Creek Plan

 

—Gettysburg Campaign —

 
Manchester Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 26, 2014
1. Manchester Marker
Inscription. On June 29, 1863, Union Gen. George G. Meade ordered the Army of the Potomac to Pipe Creek to counter any move toward Washington or Baltimore by Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia and to engage the Confederates in battle. Meade was uncertain of Lee’s strength or location.

The Federal right flank rested here at Manchester, the center of Union Mills and the left at Middleburg. Gen. John Sedgwick’s VI Corps, Meade’s largest occupied the position with 15,000 men on June 30, after marching from New Windsor through Westminster. Soon the landscape here was dotted for miles with tents and campfires. Manchester’s kind citizens brought bread, cakes, pies, and milk to the exhausted and footsore soldiers, some of whom lacked shoes. The next day the men rested, cleaned their weapons, and drew sixty rounds of ammunition each. Late in the evening, the order came to march again. VI Corps retraced its steps in the direction of Westminster to intersect Littlestown Turnpike and then marched north. The 34-mile march from Manchester in darkness and then under a scorching sun to Gettysburg was one of the longest and fastest marches of the Civil War.

(captions)
(lower left) Straggler
(upper right) Gen. George G. Meade and Gen. John Sedgwick
 
Erected by Maryland Civil
Close up of map shown on the marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 26, 2014
2. Close up of map shown on the marker
Position of the Union Army of the Potomac June 23, 1863 (midday), New Union commander Gen. George G Meade orders his army north with two objectives. Engage the Confederate Army under the best possible conditions while protecting Washington, D.C.

Learning that the Union army was close and getting closer, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee orders his army to consolidate somewhere near the Maryland-Pennsylvania border.
War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Maryland Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 39° 39.734′ N, 76° 53.463′ W. Marker is in Manchester, Maryland, in Carroll County. Marker is on Manchester Road (Maryland Route 27) 0.3 miles west of Main Street (Maryland Route 30), on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. The marker is located in Westside Memorial Park. Marker is in this post office area: Manchester MD 21102, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A different marker also named Manchester (approx. 0.3 miles away); German Church (approx. 0.4 miles away); Mason-Dixon Line (approx. 4.3 miles away in Pennsylvania); Spring Garden (approx. 4.3 miles away); Hampstead District (approx. 4.3 miles away); Hoffman Paper Mills (approx. 6.3 miles away); Union Mills (approx. 6.7 miles away); Defiance at Union Mills (approx. 6.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Manchester.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Manchester Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 26, 2014
3. Manchester Marker
Manchester Marker-Play ground in the park image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 26, 2014
4. Manchester Marker-Play ground in the park
Photo taken from behind the marker. Marker is in the lower right hand corner
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 27, 2014, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 289 times since then and 46 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on July 27, 2014, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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