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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Hawick in Kandiyohi County, Minnesota — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Battle of the Broom

 
 
Battle of the Broom Marker image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, August 27, 2014
1. Battle of the Broom Marker
Inscription. What is believed to be one of the last pitched battles between the Ojibwe and Dakota ended near this marker about 1860. Some Dakota hunters found a party of Ojibwe encroaching on Dakota grounds. They attacked, killing several Ojibwe and driving the rest to a settler's house. The settler's wife was able to drive the Dakota away with her broom, since they wanted no trouble with the settlers.

This project has been financed in part with funds provided by the State of Minnesota through the Minnesota Historical Society from the Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund and the Kandiyohi County Historical Society.

 
Erected by the State of Minnesota through the Minnesota Historical Society and the Kandiyohi County Historical Society.
 
Location. 45° 21.001′ N, 94° 49.489′ W. Marker is near Hawick, Minnesota, in Kandiyohi County. Marker is at the intersection of 160th Street Northeast and State Highway 23, on the right when traveling west on 160th Street Northeast. Touch for map. Marker is approximately eight driving miles northeast of New London. Marker is in this post office area: New London MN 56273, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the
Battle of the Broom Marker image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, August 27, 2014
2. Battle of the Broom Marker
crow flies. Veterans Memorial (approx. 4.1 miles away); How Irving Township Got Its Start (approx. 6 miles away); Federal Fish Hatchery (approx. 6.7 miles away); Robert lhlang Post 537, The American Legion (approx. 6.7 miles away); a different marker also named Veterans Memorial (approx. 6.7 miles away); Early History of New London (approx. 6.7 miles away); Origin Of Crow River Dam and Mills (approx. 6.7 miles away); Green Lake Mounds (approx. 6.7 miles away).
 
More about this marker. The marker has the Historic Site seal of the Kandiyohi County Historical Society 1895.
 
Regarding Battle of the Broom. Ojibwe (Chippewa) and Dakota (Sioux) nations had a long history of conflict for the control of the abundant natural resources in what is now Minnesota. (Minnesota became the 32nd state May 11, 1858.)
 
Also see . . .
1. Ojibwe. Wikipedia entry. (Submitted on October 31, 2014.) 

2. Sioux. Wikipedia entry. (Submitted on October 31, 2014.) 

3. Ojibwe Culture. "...the Ojibwe of northern Wisconsin continued to distrust the Americans and often traded with British traders across the border in Canada. They also continued to harbor a hatred for the Dakota, and the war between the two tribes
Battle of the Broom Site and Marker image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, August 27, 2014
3. Battle of the Broom Site and Marker
intensified in the early 1800s." (Submitted on October 31, 2014.) 

4. Battle of the Brule. Wikipedia entry. "...the Battle of the Brule was an example of the type of ongoing conflict the two nations were engaged in during the 18th and early 19th centuries. This continued warfare between the Dakota and Ojibwe figured heavily in U.S. government policy in the Wisconsin Territory. The Treaty of Prairie du Chien (1825) had been arranged with the pretext of creating peace between the two nations, and in later treaties and negotiations the government repeatedly demanded the two groups end hostilities so white settlers would see Wisconsin as a peaceful region." (Submitted on October 31, 2014.) 

5. The Ojibwe Native Americans. "The Ojibwe had little conflict with the United States during their reign, even after Fort Snelling was built in Minnesota to try to section off the Dakota from the Ojibwe. This may have been because they knew they had little chance of victory over the numerous, technologically advanced settlers. Although they presented little direct problem to the whites, they still went on attacking the Dakota as the hostilities between the two tribes continued on." (Submitted on October 31, 2014.) 

6. Ojibwe and Sioux Beginnings. The Sioux Massacre at Fort St. Charles, 1736. "After the massacre... French traders at La Pointe tried to halt the fighting, but this had been coming for years, and neither the Dakota nor the Ojibwe would listen. The war was on, and this was just the beginning." (Submitted on October 31, 2014.) 
 
Categories. Settlements & SettlersWars, US Indian
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 31, 2014, by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin. This page has been viewed 482 times since then and 191 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 31, 2014, by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin.
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