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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Petersburg in Dinwiddie County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Largest Fort

 
 
The Largest Fort Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
1. The Largest Fort Marker
Inscription. Fort Fisher was the largest of the more than 30 forts that studded the Union siege lines. It included nearly 2,000 feet of parapet and could mount 19 guns. The boom of a single gun in this fort on the morning of April 2, 1865, portended the fall of Petersburg. That solitary shot signaled the opening of the final Union assaults on the city.

“When the signal sounded the entire Corps, notwithstanding the orders to keep silent, sent up a mighty cheer and then dashed forward into the fog.”
- Lt. Col. Elisha H. Rhodes, 2nd R.I. April 2, 1865
 
Erected by Petersburg National Battlefield - National Park Service - Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 37° 10.454′ N, 77° 27.218′ W. Marker is near Petersburg, Virginia, in Dinwiddie County. Touch for map. Marker is in Petersburg National Battlefield along the Siege Line Tour. Marker is at or near this postal address: Flank Road, Petersburg VA 23803, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within one mile of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Siege of Petersburg—Grant's Fifth Offensive (within shouting distance of this marker); Petersburg Battlefields (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different
Marker in Petersburg National Battlefield image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2008
2. Marker in Petersburg National Battlefield
marker also named Petersburg Battlefields (approx. ¼ mile away); a different marker also named Petersburg Battlefields (approx. 0.3 miles away); a different marker also named Petersburg Battlefields (approx. 0.4 miles away); Fort Conahey (approx. half a mile away); A Mysterious Historic Feature (approx. one mile away); “A Great Struggle is Now Impending” (approx. one mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Petersburg.
 
More about this marker. The right portion of the marker contains a photograph of “Fort Fisher in March 1865. This view shows the fort being expanded to its final size.”

The middle of the marker features a photograph of “The Union signal tower at Peebles Farm – a quarter mile behind you – [which] loomed over Fort Fisher.”

The right portion of the map contains a map of the fortifications around Petersburg at the time of the siege. It has the caption “Fort Fisher was one of several forts built to secure ground gained by the Union during the Battle of
Interior of Fort Fisher image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
3. Interior of Fort Fisher
There is a walking trail that covers most of the interior of Fort Fisher.
Peebles’s Farm in late September and early October 1864.”


Like many other markers in Petersburg National Battlefield, this one has a Petersburg Time Line at the bottom.
 
Also see . . .
1. Heritage Documentation Programs. Fort Fisher: Assessment of the Principal Earthworks: The Federal "Fish Hook" Line, Petersburg, VA. (Submitted on May 22, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. Petersburg National Battlefield. National Park Service. (Submitted on May 22, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, US Civil
 
Observation Deck in Fort Fisher image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
4. Observation Deck in Fort Fisher
This observation deck looks toward were the Confederate lines were located during the siege of Petersburg.
Fort Fisher Walking Trail image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
5. Fort Fisher Walking Trail
Fort Fisher was the largest earthen fortification in the Petersburg area, which can be seen in this photo. It was constructed in March of 1865.
Interior of Fort Fisher image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2008
6. Interior of Fort Fisher
Since Fort Fisher was more than a mile from the closest Confederate fortification, it was never directly attacked and saw little bombardment during the siege.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 22, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,351 times since then and 42 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on May 22, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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