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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Green Bay in Brown County, Wisconsin — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Oneida Veterans Memorial

 
 
Oneida Veterans Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, June 8, 2014
1. Oneida Veterans Memorial Marker
Inscription.
Welcome to the Oneida Veterans Memorial

Civil War

About the War: The civil war was fought in 1861-1865 between the United States (the "Union" or the "North") and several southern slave states that declared their secession and formed the Confederate States of America (the "Confederacy" or the "South"). The war had its origin in the issue of slavery, especially the extension of slavery into the western territories. After four years of bloody combat that left over 600,000 soldiers dead and destroyed much of the South's infrastructure, the Confederacy collapsed, slavery was abolished, and the difficult reconstruction process of restoring national unity and guaranteeing rights to the freed slaves began.

Oneidas in the Civil War

In spite of the oppression many Native Americans suffered, Native American men stood with the United States to fight against slavery. Although the war began in 1861, the Oneidas did not participate until 1863. There were not enough volunteers to fight in the war so President Lincoln allowed a bonus of $300 per person. The Oneidas were not citizens of the United States and could not be drafted. Many non-Oneida men who were drafted offered Oneida men the $300 bonus if the Oneida man took their place. About 1/10th of the Oneida
Oneida Veterans Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, June 8, 2014
2. Oneida Veterans Memorial Marker
two-sided marker with duplicate text
population between the ages of 17 - 45 served in the war. Fathers and sons both enlisted and women were left at home to do the farming.

The Significant Parts of the Wall

Oneida Wampum Belt (Diamond belt shown above)
This belt is the inspiration for the back of the wall. The original wampum belt was made by the Oneidas and each diamond represents one of the 6 nations of the Iroquois Confederacy. On the wall we have 50 diamonds to represent the 50 chiefs of the Iroquois Confederacy.

The Eagle
The eagle is sacred not only to the Oneida, but of all Indian country. The eagle flies the highest of all birds and forever keeps a watchful and protective eye over them. It's a symbol that represents a philosophy of the Oneida which incorporates the sentiment that everything that is said and done today will have impact on the next seven generations.

Stainless Steel Plate
To leave items of remembrance.

Perforated Plate
Under each granite slab are plates that are 12 inches long to respresent one year of war.

Colored Concrete Wall
Signifies permenance while serving as a timeline of every war since the American Revolution. The small holes in the wall respresent the imperfections of war.

Concrete Pavers
Pattern on pavers siginifies eagle feathers.
 
Erected
Oneida Veterans Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, June 8, 2014
3. Oneida Veterans Memorial Marker
Oneida Veterans Wall
2007 by the Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin.
 
Location. 44° 31.261′ N, 88° 8.052′ W. Marker is in Green Bay, Wisconsin, in Brown County. Marker can be reached from Pleasant Lane north of West Mason Street (Wisconsin Highway 54), on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Memorial is 2.6 miles west of U.S. 41 within the Oneida Reservation. Marker is in this post office area: Green Bay WI 54313, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Revolutionary War Veteran (approx. 3 miles away); Earl L. (Curly) Lambeau (approx. 3.8 miles away); Robert E. Harlan Plaza (approx. 3.9 miles away); Vincent T. (Vince) Lombardi (approx. 3.9 miles away); Love at First Leap (approx. 3.9 miles away); Bryan Bartlett Starr (approx. 4.2 miles away); Shantytown (approx. 5.7 miles away); Menomineeville, Seat of Justice (approx. 5.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Green Bay.
 
More about this marker. photo captions:
• Abraham Lincoln
• Oneida Soldiers From the Civil War
 
Also see . . .
1. Veterans Wall. (Submitted on November 18, 2014.)
2. Historical Note Archives. (Submitted on November 18, 2014.)
3. The Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin. (Submitted on November 18, 2014.)
 
Additional comments.
Revolutionary War image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, June 8, 2014
4. Revolutionary War
1774 - 1783
The Oneida are the forgotten Allies of the Thirteen Colonies. They suffered heavy casualties at the Battle of Oriskany, August 6, 1777, supplied corn to General George Washington's starving army at Valley Forge, April, 1778; and thwarted an ambush of General Lafayette's Continental forces at Barren Hill, losing six Oneida scouts.

1. Wisconsin Oneida
Originally, the Wisconsin Oneida people resided in the Central New York area. About 100 Oneidas traveled to the Green Bay area in 1823, with more families following in the next 20 years. Source: Explore Oneida website
    — Submitted November 18, 2014.

 
Categories. Military
 
War of 1812 image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, June 8, 2014
5. War of 1812
1812 - 1815
The Indian Tribes of the Ohio and Northwest area fought for Great Britain because they were angered at the colonists taking and settling their lands. However, the Oneidas, once again, allied themselves with the colonists and suffered a number of casualties. The Treaty of Ghent ended the war. There was no land lost or gained, and peaceful relations between the United States and Great Britain advanced from that time forward.
Civil War image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, June 8, 2014
6. Civil War
1861 - 1865
Over one-tenth of the Oneida population enlisted in the army for the Union Cause. Of these volunteers, 46 were killed, missing in action, or died in the South of disease. They distinguished themselves at the Atlanta Campaign and the Battle of Nashville. The Oneidas organized a company of sharpshooters in the 3rd Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry.
Spanish American War image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, June 8, 2014
7. Spanish American War
1898
The Spanish American War was an armed conflict between Spain and the United States that took place from April to August 1898. The Treaty of Paris after only 109 days of war, ended the conflict and gave the United States ownership of the former Spanish colonies of Puerto Rico, the Philippines and Guam. Oneida men volunteered for service in this war. Although there were no known Oneida casualties, combat from this war claimed 432 American lives.
World War I image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, June 8, 2014
8. World War I
1917 - 1918
Over one-tenth of the Oneida population enlisted in the army for the Union Cause. Of these volunteers, 46 were killed, missing in action, or died in the South of disease. They distinguished themselves at the Atlanta Campaign and the Battle of Nashville. The Oneidas organized a company of sharpshooters in the 3rd Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry.
World War II image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, June 8, 2014
9. World War II
1941 - 1946
Hundreds of Oneida men and women left their homes to fight in all theaters of the war, from Africa to Italy, Germany, the South Pacific and Asian mainland. Some were victims of the Bataan Death March in the Philippines. Eventually, the Philippines and survivors of the Bataan Death March were liberated.
Korean War image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, June 8, 2014
10. Korean War
1950 - 1955
Many of the Oneida who served in WWII also served in Korea. Members enlisted and some were drafted into all branches of the military. During combat, some experienced extreme deprivation and poor conditions as prisoners of war. This war is often referred to as the "Forgotten War."
Vietnam War image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, June 8, 2014
11. Vietnam War
1964 - 1975
The Vietnam War was called the longest of all American wars. The Oneida men and women of this war were very likely the family of veterans who served in other previous American wars. The Oneida were well represented in all branches of the military in this unconventional war.
Desert Shield/Desert Storm image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, June 8, 2014
12. Desert Shield/Desert Storm
1990 - 1991
Oneida members, as part of a U.S. led coalition, were called up to liberate Kuwait and defend Saudi Arabia and other countries in the Gulf region from Iraq.
War in Bosnia image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, June 8, 2014
13. War in Bosnia
1992 - 1995
Oneida members participated as peacekeeping armed forces in Operation Joint Endeavor with the United Nations to prevent further massacres and genocide in this region.
Kosovo War image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, June 8, 2014
14. Kosovo War
1996 - 1999
During Operation Allied Force, Oneida members were tasked with NATO forces to defend Kosovo against "ethnic cleansing" and compel compliance with the demands of the international community.
War on Terror image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, June 8, 2014
15. War on Terror
2001 - Present
Following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Oneida men and women were deployed worldwide to conduct combat operations against terrorists and countries that support and harbor terrorism and to defend our country from future attacks.
Future Warriors Panel image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, June 8, 2014
16. Future Warriors Panel
Dedicated to our future warriors who will proudly represent Oneida and serve the United States to help maintain peace and the freedoms we enjoy.
Oneida Nation Veterans Seal image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, June 8, 2014
17. Oneida Nation Veterans Seal
On^yote§a•ka
People of the Standing Stone
Oneida Veterans Memorial image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, June 8, 2014
18. Oneida Veterans Memorial
Oneida Veterans Memorial image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, June 8, 2014
19. Oneida Veterans Memorial
Eagle Statue image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, June 8, 2014
20. Eagle Statue
The Oneida Veterans Wall can be seen in the distance.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 18, 2014, by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin. This page has been viewed 281 times since then and 43 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20. submitted on November 18, 2014, by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin.
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