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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Hermitage in Davidson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Land Conservation at The Hermitage

Prescribed Grazing Plan

 
 
Land Conservation at The Hermitage Marker image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, September 25, 2010
1. Land Conservation at The Hermitage Marker
Inscription. Prescribed grazing at the Hermitage improves forage, animal, soil, and water resources.

Animal resources are improved by striving to maintain quality forge 3” to 8” tall. This height allows graze animals to have optimum intake. When animal graze lower than 3” they expend more energy in search of forage and gain less weight. Forage taller than 8” is typically stemmy and lower quality.

Plant resources are more vigorous and resilient when plants are not grazed lower than 3”. Most of the energy plants store are in the basal stems and roots, however, for the bulk of their energy needs plants need leaves to capture solar energy for photosynthesis. Overgrazed pastures are less productive, capture less sunlight, and are more sensitive to drought than well-managed pastures.

Soil resources are improved because vigorous grass and roots improve soil structure and builds organic matter.

Water resources are improved by slowing runoff flowing through taller more vigorous forage. Also, healthy plants take up and cycle more nutrients than overgrazed pastures.

Flooding is reduced because runoff is three times less on properly managed forage. Greater infiltration of rain water helps recharge groundwater and provides more available water for plant uptake and growth.
Land Conservation at The Hermitage Marker image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, September 25, 2010
2. Land Conservation at The Hermitage Marker

 
Erected by The Hermitage.
 
Location. 36° 13.001′ N, 86° 36.657′ W. Marker is in Hermitage, Tennessee, in Davidson County. Marker can be reached from Rachel's Lane. Touch for map. Located at the Hermitage historical site. Marker is in this post office area: Hermitage TN 37076, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A home for Jackson’s Slaves (a few steps from this marker); Abandonment and Preservation (within shouting distance of this marker); Growing Cotton (within shouting distance of this marker); The Belted Galloway (within shouting distance of this marker); The Hermitage Landscape (within shouting distance of this marker); A Future President's Home (within shouting distance of this marker); Field Quarter Trail (within shouting distance of this marker); The First Hermitage (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Hermitage.
 
Categories. Agriculture
 
Land Conservation at The Hermitage Marker image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, September 25, 2010
3. Land Conservation at The Hermitage Marker
Warm seasons forage on 20% to 30% of the forage system insures more summer forage production. Watering troughs placed so livestock travel less than 800’ to water improves grazing and waste distribution. Placed troughs so fields can be cross-fenced in the future. Multiple paddocks allow forage to rest, re-grow, and assure stockpile forage in times of slow re-growth. Technical assistance and funding for the fence and water system were provided by the Natural Resources Conservation System, Davidson county Soil conservation District, Tennessee Department of Agriculture, and Gallagher Fence Company. “USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer.”
Wide view of Land Conservation at The Hermitage Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, June 14, 2015
4. Wide view of Land Conservation at The Hermitage Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 10, 2012, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa. This page has been viewed 384 times since then and 24 times this year. Last updated on March 13, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on February 10, 2012, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa.   4. submitted on July 12, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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