Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
San Juan Opico, La Libertad, El Salvador — Central America (West Coast)
 

Joya de Cerén

 
 
Joya de Cerén Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, March 7, 2015
1. Joya de Cerén Marker
Inscription.
Gobierno de la República de El Salvador
Joya de Cerén
Patrimonio de la Humanidad
Este sitio arqueológico Joya de Cerén, fue solemnemente declarado Patrimonio de la Humanidad en la XVII sesión del Comité del Patrimonio Mundial de UNESCO el día 8 de diciembre de 1993, en Cartagena, Colombia, siendo Presidente de la República el Licenciado Alfredo Felix Cristiani.
Ministerio de Educación
San Salvador, El Salvador, C.A.

English translation:
Government of the Republic of El Salvador
Joya de Ceren
World Heritage Site
This archeological site Joya de Ceren, was solemnly declared a World Heritage Site in the XVII session of the World Heritage Site Committee of UNESCO on December 8, 1993, in Cartagena, Colombia, under the President of the Republic Alfredo Felix Cristiani.
Ministry of Education
San Salvador, El Salvador, Central America
[Seals of El Salvador, UNESCO and Concultura]
 
Erected 1993.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization marker series.
 
Location. 13° 49.704′ N, 89° 21.394′ W. Marker is in San Juan Opico, La Libertad. Touch for map. Marker is near the entrance to the archeological expositions at the Joya de Cerén park.
 
Other nearby markers.
Wide view of the Joya de Cerén Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, March 7, 2015
2. Wide view of the Joya de Cerén Marker
An additional UNESCO marker is on the left and a map of the site on the right.
At least 8 other markers are within 19 kilometers of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Abandonment of the San Andrés Archaeological Site (approx. 4.6 kilometers away); Indigo Production at San Andrés (approx. 4.7 kilometers away); San Andrés was an extensive prehispanic settlement (approx. 4.7 kilometers away); San Andrés Archaeological Site (approx. 4.7 kilometers away); Structure 7 at San Andrés Archaeological Site (approx. 4.8 kilometers away); El Boqueron National Park (approx. 13.4 kilometers away); Three Decades of Alberto Masferrer University (approx. 18.1 kilometers away in San Salvador); Thelma Davidson de López (approx. 18.4 kilometers away in San Salvador).
 
Regarding Joya de Cerén.
Joya de Cerén was a pre-Hispanic farming community that, like Pompeii and Herculaneum in Italy, was buried under an eruption of the Laguna Caldera volcano c. AD 600. Because of the exceptional condition of the remains, they provide an insight into the daily lives of the Central American populations who worked the land at that time.


The site was discovered during the construction of Government grain-storage silos in 1976, when a clay-built structure was exposed by a bulldozer. Excavations were carried out under the direction of Dr. Paysan D. Sheets (University of Colorado) in 1978 and 1980, but were interrupted by
Joya de Cerén Comunal House image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, March 7, 2015
3. Joya de Cerén Comunal House
civil war. They were resumed in 1989 and have been continuing since that time.
 
Categories. Native AmericansSettlements & Settlers
 
Joya de Cerén Sauna marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, March 7, 2015
4. Joya de Cerén Sauna marker
The sauna was a place to purify and clean oneself.
Joya de Cerén sauna image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, March 7, 2015
5. Joya de Cerén sauna
Water was poured over heated rocks inside the sauna. This same system is still used by indigenous people in Central America today.
Joya de Cerén Shaman area image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, March 7, 2015
6. Joya de Cerén Shaman area
This house was were a local "shaman" practiced their arts.
Joya de Cerén shaman area image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, March 7, 2015
7. Joya de Cerén shaman area
Joya de Cerén domestic group image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, March 7, 2015
8. Joya de Cerén domestic group
A domestic grouping was made up of a house, a kitchen and a storage room.
Joya de Cerén domestic grouping of buildings image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, March 7, 2015
9. Joya de Cerén domestic grouping of buildings
Joya de Cerén museum image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, March 7, 2015
10. Joya de Cerén museum
Joya de Cerén informational marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, March 7, 2015
11. Joya de Cerén informational marker
This marker describes that Joya de Cerén was one of many pre-Hispanic communities in an area known as Zapotitlan.
Joya de Cerén buried building image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, March 7, 2015
12. Joya de Cerén buried building
One of the first buried buildings on the site tour.
Joya de Cerén Comunal House informational marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, March 7, 2015
13. Joya de Cerén Comunal House informational marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 14, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. This page has been viewed 331 times since then and 54 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13. submitted on March 14, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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