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Gulf Shores in Baldwin County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

The Battery Lincoln

Position of Company “C” of the 20th Iowa Infantry

 
 
The Battery Lincoln Marker image. Click for full size.
By Timothy Carr, June 19, 2013
1. The Battery Lincoln Marker
Inscription.
Completed on August 18th, Battery Lincoln was located near the northern end of the Federal siege lines of Fort Morgan. Company “C” of the 20th Iowa Infantry Regiment, under the command of Captain Mark L. Thomson, was detailed to serve as sharpshooters on the siege line.

Near daybreak on August 22nd, the last great bombardment of Fort Morgan commenced. Private Samuel Crawford of the 20th Iowa detailed the accurate shelling of the mortars in a diary he penned during the operations on Mobile Point.

"The Navy & Mortars commenced and such a steady stream of shot and shell I never saw. It beet (sic) anything they ever had at Vicksburg on one fort for so long…They kept up the fire from all side until about 8 o.clk. Then the mortars alone were left at the work. After about an hour…they got the range so that they thrower every shell into the fort. Captain Thomson said that with the mortars they had charge of they throwed 40 shells in an hour & 15 minutes that is about as fast as they could use four pieces."

Private Rufe Dooley of the 1st Indiana Heavy Artillery described the deadly spectacle of the bombardment in a letter to his mother.

"All the artillery opened at daylight and kept it up all day...night closed in and our breastworks were just begun but now came the most beautiful
The Battery Lincoln Marker image. Click for full size.
By Timothy Carr, June 19, 2013
2. The Battery Lincoln Marker
sight I ever saw. The mortar shells had set something on fire in the fort which made a terrible sight, then they doubled their firing...and the shells rolled in with a thundering roar that shook the sand peninsular to the waters edge..."


After Fort Morgan's surrender, Captain Thomson, as well as Lieutenants R. M. Lytle and W.M. Johnson who each commanded a section of two mortars, received the personal thanks of General Gordon Granger for the “gallant manner” in which they handled the operations of their guns during the siege.
 
Location. 30° 13.825′ N, 88° 1.136′ W. Marker is in Gulf Shores, Alabama, in Baldwin County. Marker can be reached from Fort Morgan Road (State Road 180) 1.3 miles west of Dune Drive, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is located on the grounds of Fort Morgan State Historic Park about 300 yards past the park's entrance behind Officer's Row. Marker is at or near this postal address: 51 Highway 180 West, Gulf Shores AL 36542, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Officer’s Row (within shouting distance of this marker); "The Shells Were Bursting All Around Us" (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Overland Campaign (approx.
The Battery Lincoln image. Click for full size.
By Timothy Carr, June 19, 2013
3. The Battery Lincoln
Position of Company “C” of the 20th Iowa Infantry
0.2 miles away); The Pride of Seven Flags (approx. ¼ mile away); 6.4” (100 pounder) Parrott Rifle / 7” Brooke Rifle (approx. ¼ mile away); U.S. Model 1918M1 155mm Gun and Model 1918A1 Carriage (approx. ¼ mile away); 32 Pounder Sea Coast Defense Gun (approx. ¼ mile away); "Damn The Torpedoes!" The Campaigns for Mobile, 1864 - 1865 (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Gulf Shores.
 
Also see . . .  Fort Morgan, Guardian On The Bay. (Submitted on November 9, 2013, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Image On Marker: image. Click for full size.
By Timothy Carr, June 19, 2013
4. Image On Marker:
A Federal artilleryman aims an 8-inch siege mortar by using a chord connected to the top of the parapet and a simple grid that surrounds the gun.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 9, 2013, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. This page has been viewed 806 times since then and 215 times this year. Last updated on March 21, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on November 9, 2013, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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