Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Bedford in Bedford County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Lincoln Highway Meets the Superhighway

 
 
The Lincoln Highway Meets the Superhighway Marker image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Busta-Peck, May 28, 2008
1. The Lincoln Highway Meets the Superhighway Marker
Inscription. Nearly three centuries of transportation history can be found in Pennsylvania: native American paths to wagon trails, early canals and railroads, the Forbes and Burd Roads, and a string of ten other turnpikes. However, none were more important in the development of this region and much of our nation than the Lincoln Highway and the Pennsylvania Turnpike.

In 1913 the nation's first cross-country highway was designated the Lincoln Highway. It stretched from New York City to San Francisco - the first true highway link with the west. That year there were only 600,000 automobiles in the whole country. Today, more than 47,000 cars and trucks travel the Lincoln Highway and the Pennsylvania Turnpike in Bedford County area each day. The Federal Highway Commission stopped naming highways in 1925, and began using a numbering system. In Pennsylvania, much of the Lincoln Highway was assigned Route 30.

With an ever increasing number of cars and trucks, and the increases public pressure for hard-surfaced highways, a Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission was inaugurated in 1937. On October 1, 1940 at 12:01 a.m. the first 160 miles of four-lane all concrete highway from Carlisle to Irwin was opened. Some motorists waited days to be the first to ride on this new superhighway.

The turnpike was extended east to Philadelphia
Three markers, two of them historical. image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Busta-Peck, May 28, 2008
2. Three markers, two of them historical.
The one in question is the furthest from the camera.
and west to the Ohio line in 1957, creating a 330-mile superhighway. Other states took Pennsylvania's lead and constructed similar four-lane paved toll roads. Solving the major engineering challenges of crossing the Allegheny Mountains also made Pennsylvania a pioneer in major road construction. This occurred first with the scening mountain route of the Lincoln Highway, and then the difficult "tunnel" construction of the Pennsylvania Turnpike.
 
Erected by the Lincoln Highway Heritage Corridor.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Lincoln Highway marker series.
 
Location. 40° 1.81′ N, 78° 29.583′ W. Marker is in Bedford, Pennsylvania, in Bedford County. Marker is on Pennsylvania Turnpike (Interstate 76). Touch for map. Marker is in the eastbound rest area. Marker is in this post office area: Bedford PA 15522, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Pennsylvania Turnpike (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Pennsylvania Turnpike (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Bedford Village (approx. 0.6 miles away); a different marker also named Bedford Village (approx. 0.8
The Lincoln Highway Meets the Superhighway image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Busta-Peck, May 28, 2008
3. The Lincoln Highway Meets the Superhighway
This large sign works with the same theme as the historical marker. It was also created by the Lincoln Highway Heritage Corridor.
miles away); Fraser Tavern (approx. 0.9 miles away); Anderson House (approx. 0.9 miles away); Grist Millstone (approx. 0.9 miles away); Espy House (approx. 0.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Bedford.
 
Also see . . .  The Lincoln Highway Heritage Corridor. (Submitted on June 3, 2009, by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio.)
 
Categories. 20th CenturyRoads & Vehicles
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 6, 2008, by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio. This page has been viewed 1,353 times since then and 33 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on June 6, 2008, by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio.
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