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Vicksburg National Military Park in Warren County, Mississippi — The American South (East South Central)
 

The End In Sight

 
 
The End In Sight Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Bruce
1. The End In Sight Marker
Inscription. After 47 days under siege, the battle could only end in surrender—or a dramatic rescue. Inside Vicksburg, General Pemberton faced harsh realities—one third of his troops were too sick to fight, their drinking water was contaminated, they were short of food and ammunition. Union troops and cannon completely surrounded him. Then came a final message from General Johnston saying his army in central Mississippi was too weak to relieve Vicksburg.

Pemberton asked Grant for surrender terms. Grant did not want to have to feed 30,000 prisoners of war, or transport so many men north to prison camps. He offered to let Vicksburg’s defenders go home, if they promised they would not fight against the United States again until exchanged. Pemberton accepted the terms. On July 4th, the Confederates handed over their guns. Union troops marched victoriously into the city.

On 3rd July 1863 at about ten o’clock a.m., white flags appeared on a portion of the Rebel works. It was a glorious sight to officers and soldiers on the line…
Ulysses S. Grant

(captions)
(lower left) Grant and Pemberton meet to discuss the Confederate surrender of Vicksburg.
(lower right) At the Visitor center you can see a 10-foot-tall marble column that first marked the Surrender Interview Site near here in 1864.
The End In Sight Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, November 28, 2008
2. The End In Sight Marker
Souvenir hunters later damaged the monument. To keep this monument safe, the National Park Service put the column inside the museum.
 
Erected by Vicksburg National Military Park.
 
Location. 32° 21.447′ N, 90° 50.675′ W. Marker is in Vicksburg National Military Park, Mississippi, in Warren County. Marker is on Pemberton Avenue east of Confederate Avenue, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Located in Vicksburg National Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Vicksburg MS 39183, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Surrender Interview Site (a few steps from this marker); C.S. Appeal (Arkansas) Battery; (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Pembroke S· Senteny (about 400 feet away); Eugene Erwin (about 400 feet away); Melancthon Smith (about 500 feet away); C S Missouri (about 500 feet away); Third Louisiana Redan, On Left of Jackson Road. (about 500 feet away); Affair of the Crater; June 25-26, 1863. (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Vicksburg National Military Park.
 
Also see . . .  Vicksburg National Military Park. (Submitted on March 25, 2015.)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
The Surrender Interview Site image. Click for full size.
By William Bruce
3. The Surrender Interview Site
This 42-pounder cannon marks the Surrender Interview Site image. Click for full size.
By William Bruce
4. This 42-pounder cannon marks the Surrender Interview Site
Original Surrender Interview Site Monument image. Click for full size.
By William Bruce
5. Original Surrender Interview Site Monument
This marble shaft, erected by Union occupation forces in 1864, was one of the earliest monuments ever placed on a Civil War battlefield. It was moved to the Visitor Center for safekeeping.
A Negotiated Surrender Marker (moved to Visitor Center) image. Click for full size.
By William Bruce
6. A Negotiated Surrender Marker (moved to Visitor Center)
At 3 o'clock on the hot afternoon of July 3, 1863, General John C. Pemberton and General Ulysses S. Grant met here to discuss the surrender of Vicksburg. Although the generals failed to come to terms at this meeting, an exchange of letters late that night resulted in acceptable terms. The city and its garrison were surrendered by Pemberton on July 4. The fall of Vicksburg marked a turning point in the war as it gave the North undisputed control of the Mississippi River and split the Confederacy in two.
<i>Memorial to General's Grant and Pemberton...</i> image. Click for full size.
May 22, 1937
7. Memorial to General's Grant and Pemberton...
This colorized postcard reproduces the inset picture on the marker A Negotiated Surrender of Hon. John C. Pemberton, III and Col. Ulysses S. Grant, III, grandsons of the army commanders at Vicksburg, taken on May 22, 1937.
Original Surrender Monument in Vicksburg National Cemetery image. Click for full size.
Image by Detroit Photographic Company, circa 1910
8. Original Surrender Monument in Vicksburg National Cemetery
This vintage postcard view shows the original surrender monument when it was located in the Vicksburg National Cemetery, i.e. after it was removed from the original site, but before it was relocated indoors to the visitor center. Note that it have had, apparently, its own marker, but the resolution of this image is too low to read more than the title lines, "An Act - To Establish and to Protect National Cemeteries...".
<i>The Surrender Monument, Vicksburg</i> image. Click for full size.
Photochrom postcard by the Detroit Photographic Company, 1900
9. The Surrender Monument, Vicksburg
Image courtesy of the Yale Collection of Western Americana, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 8, 2017. This page originally submitted on March 25, 2015, by William Bruce of Madison, Wisconsin. This page has been viewed 317 times since then and 72 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on March 25, 2015, by William Bruce of Madison, Wisconsin.   2. submitted on September 4, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee.   3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on March 25, 2015, by William Bruce of Madison, Wisconsin.   7, 8, 9. submitted on August 30, 2015. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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