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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Palisades in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Original Federal Boundary Stone NW 4

 
 
Original Federal Boundary Stone NW 4 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, March 7, 2015
1. Original Federal Boundary Stone NW 4 Marker
Inscription.
Original Federal Boundary Stone
District of Columbia
Placed 1791 1792
Protected by Columbia Chapter
Daughters of the American Revolution
July 12, 1915

 
Erected 1915 by The Columbia Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution, and the Original Federal Boundary Stones marker series.
 
Location. 38° 56.256′ N, 77° 6.939′ W. Marker is in Palisades, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on Capital Cresent Trail, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is on the grounds of the fenced Dalecarlia Reservoir. The marker is visible through the chain link fence along the Capital Crescent Trail. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20016, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Chain Bridge (approx. 0.6 miles away in Virginia); Fort Marcy, Virginia (approx. 0.6 miles away in Virginia); a different marker also named Fort Marcy (approx. 0.6 miles away in Virginia); Auxiliary Battery (approx. 0.6 miles away in
Original Federal Boundary Stone NW 4 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 31, 2005
2. Original Federal Boundary Stone NW 4 Marker
Seen through the fence along the Capital Crescent Trail
Virginia); Pimmit Run and Chain Bridge (approx. 0.6 miles away in Virginia); The Mouth of Pimmit Run (approx. 0.6 miles away in Virginia); A Canal Home (approx. 0.7 miles away in Maryland); Clay and Randolph Duel (approx. 0.9 miles away in Virginia).
 
Also see . . .
1. Boundary Stone Northwest 4. Boundary Stones of DC. (Submitted on April 11, 2015.) 

2. Columbia Chapter Promotes Preservation of Original Boundary Stones of Federal District. Daughters of the American Revolution Magazine, Volume XLVII, No 3, Sept. 1915. (Submitted on April 11, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 

3. Boundary Stone Northwest 4. Fred Woodward, 1907, A ramble along the boundary stones of the District of Columbia with a camera, Records of the Columbia Historical Society (Submitted on April 11, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
Categories. Man-Made FeaturesPatriots & Patriotism
 
Original Federal Boundary Stone NW 4 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, March 7, 2015
3. Original Federal Boundary Stone NW 4 Marker
1792 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, March 7, 2015
4. 1792
Jurisdiction of the United States image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, March 7, 2015
5. Jurisdiction of the United States
Miles 4
100 P
4 miles from Northwest 3 would have been in the Potomac Gorge, so this boundary stone was placed 100 Poles, (1650 feet) northeast of the four mile point.
Maryland image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, March 7, 2015
6. Maryland
Patriotic Services image. Click for full size.
By G. V. Buck, 1915
7. Patriotic Services
The Columbia Chapter of the DAR holds patriotic services at NW 4 on July 12, 1915.
“ Left to right, in foreground, Mrs. Mary R. Lockwood, Chaplain General; Miss Grace M. Pierce, Registrar General; Mrs. George T. Smallwood, Vice-President General of the District of Columbia.”
Fred Woodward image. Click for full size.
8. Fred Woodward
Fred E. Woodward posed with this stone on his “Ramble around the Boundary Stones” in 1906.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 23, 2017. This page originally submitted on April 11, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 265 times since then and 43 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on April 11, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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