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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Memphis in Shelby County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Confederate History of Memphis

 
 
Confederate History of Memphis Marker image. Click for full size.
By Ken Smith, February 3, 2009
1. Confederate History of Memphis Marker
Inscription. This bluff was fortified by Gen. Pillow May 1862. Thirty seven companies were equipped here for the Confederate service. The Confederate Ram, Arkansas, one of the first ironclad battleships in the Navy, was built and partially armored here, but fearing capture she was sent down the river to be completed and was not ready for action at the time of the attack of the Federal fleet June 6, 1862.

The Confederate fleet of 8 boats protected only by cotton bales and carrying 18 guns gallantly resisted this attack of 6 armored gun boats, 4 rams and 20 mortar boats carrying 84 guns.

The engagement lasted 90 minutes and was the first battle between steam rams in history.

At dawn Aug. 21, 1864, Gen. N. B. Forrest made his grand strategic raid into Memphis, which was then held by Federal generals with 10,000 men. His object being to check the advance of the Federal army into Miss. Arriving here with only 1500 picked men, spent with 50 hours continuous marching, he sent this telegram "Forrest holds Memphis" to the Federal headquarters in Miss.

The Federal officers, taken by surprise, rushed from their bedrooms and secreted themselves about the city.

After spending 2 hours here, Forrest cut the wires, and left the city taking 500 prisoners, and large quantities of supplies. His loss was only 25 wounded
Confederate History of Memphis Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, October 9, 2010
2. Confederate History of Memphis Marker
Marker with the Mississippi River in the distance.
and 9 killed, while the enemy's loss was 90 wounded and 30 killed.

Pres. Davis was a resident of this city for 9 years after his release from prison.
Palms for the Southern Soldier
Crowns for the veteran's head
and loyal love and honor
for our Confederate dead.

 
Erected 1909 by Confederate Dames, Tyler Chapter.
 
Location. 35° 8.791′ N, 90° 3.262′ W. Marker is in Memphis, Tennessee, in Shelby County. Marker is on Front Street south of Jefferson Ave., on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 51 N. Front Street, Memphis TN 38103, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Naval Battle of Memphis, 1862 (a few steps from this marker); Capt. J. Harvey Mathes (within shouting distance of this marker); Memphis and Shelby County Medical Society (within shouting distance of this marker); Confederate Park (within shouting distance of this marker); Jefferson Davis Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Elizabeth Avery Meriwether (within shouting distance of
Confederate History of Memphis Marker image. Click for full size.
By Ken Smith, February 3, 2009
3. Confederate History of Memphis Marker
Marker is in Memphis City Park. Marker is under the third window from the right.
this marker); Virginia ("Ginnie") Bethel Moon (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Cobblestone Landing (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Memphis.
 
More about this marker. Three parks in Memphis including Confederate Park have had their names changed by the City Council. The park mentioned in this post has had its name changed to Memphis City Park.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Confederate Park sign image. Click for full size.
By Ken Smith, February 3, 2009
4. Confederate Park sign
Prior to its renaming in February 2013, this park was known as Confederate Park.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on January 27, 2012, by Ken Smith of Milan, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 690 times since then and 53 times this year. Last updated on May 3, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. Photos:   1. submitted on January 27, 2012, by Ken Smith of Milan, Tennessee.   2. submitted on September 7, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee.   3, 4. submitted on January 27, 2012, by Ken Smith of Milan, Tennessee. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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