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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Rome in Metropolitan City of Rome, Lazio, Italy — Central Italy (Tyrrhenian Coast)
 

Altar of Caesar / Ara di Cesare

 
 
Altar of Caesar / Ara di Cesare Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 3, 2013
1. Altar of Caesar / Ara di Cesare Marker
Inscription.
Ara di Cesare
...deposero (l spoglia di Cesare) nel Foro, la dove l'antica reggia dei Romani, e vi accumularono sopra tavole, sedili e quanto altro legname era l...accesero il fuoco e tutto il popolo assistette al rogo durante la notte. In quel luogo venne eretta dapprima un'ara, ora vi il tempio dello stesso Cesare, nel quale egli onorato come un dio

Appiano de Bello Civ II 148



English translation:
Altar of Caesar
...they placed Caesars body again in the Forum where in ancient times stood the palace of the kings of Rome. There they collected together sticks of wood and benches, of which there were many in the Forum, and anything else they could find of that sort, for a funeral pile. Then they set fire to it, and the entire people remained by the funeral pile throughout the night. There an altar was first erected, but now there stands the Temple of Caesar himself, as he was deemed worthy of divine honors

Appian, The Civil Wars, Book II, Section 148
 
Location. 41° 53.527′ N, 12° 29.162′ E. Marker is in Rome, Lazio, in Metropolitan City of Rome. Touch for map. Marker and ruins are in the Roman Forum. Marker is at or near this postal address: Via Sacra, Rome, Lazio 00186, Italy.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers

Altar of Caesar / Ara di Cesare and Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 3, 2013
2. Altar of Caesar / Ara di Cesare and Marker
are within walking distance of this marker. Roman Forum (a few steps from this marker); Roman Forum. History of the Excavations (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Roman Forum (a few steps from this marker); Tabernae at the Front of the Basilica Aemilia (a few steps from this marker); Forum Square (within shouting distance of this marker); Regia (within shouting distance of this marker); Temple of Antoninus and Faustina (within shouting distance of this marker); Shrine of Venus Cloacina / Sacello di Venere Cloacina (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Rome.
 
Also see . . .
1. Temple of Caesar. (Submitted on June 14, 2015, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. Rome Reborn: A Digital Model of Ancient Rome. (Submitted on June 14, 2015, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
3. Roman Forum. (Submitted on June 14, 2015, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
4. Forum Romanum. (Submitted on June 14, 2015, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Additional comments.
1. Appian's "The Civil Wars"
The marker text is a fragment of "The Civil Wars" by Appian, translated by Horace White in 1899. His original translation is as follows:

[148] The murderers fled from the city secretly. The people returned to Csar's bier and bore it as a consecrated thing to the Capitol in order to bury it in the temple and place it among the gods. Being prevented from doing so by the priests, they placed it again in the forum where in the olden time stood the palace of the kings of Rome. There they collected together sticks of wood and benches, of which there were many in the forum, and anything else they could find of that sort, for a funeral pile, throwing on it the adornments of the procession, some of which were very costly. Some of them cast their own crowns upon it and many military gifts. Then they set fire to it, and the entire people remained by the funeral pile throughout the night. There an altar was first erected, but now there stands the temple of Csar himself, as he was deemed worthy of divine honors; for Octavius, his son by adoption, who took the name of Csar, and, following in the footsteps of the latter in political matters, greatly strengthened the government founded by Csar, and which remains to this day, decreed divine honors to his father. From this example the Romans now pay like honors to each emperor at his death if he has not reigned in a tyrannical manner or made himself odious, although at first they could not bear to call them kings while living.
    — Submitted September 7, 2016, by J. Makali Bruton of Quertaro, Mexico.

 
Categories. Churches, Etc.Man-Made FeaturesPolitics
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 7, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 14, 2015, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 404 times since then and 96 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on June 14, 2015, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.
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