Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Richmond in Madison County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

“Good, Common-Sense Soldiering”

A Bold Move

 
 
Good, Common-Sense Soldiering Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, March 30, 2012
1. Good, Common-Sense Soldiering Marker
Inscription. The fight at Kingston began around dawn on August 30, 1862, with skirmishers on both sides trading shots. Upon being notified of the exchange, Union Gen. Mahlon Manson led his men south along the State Road. He deployed his brigade of the Army of Kentucky along the ridges on either side of Mt. Zion Church, placing artillery between each of the three infantry regiments. Another infantry regiment was held in reserve. While the Union forces marched south, a Confederate division under Gen. Patrick Cleburne pushed north from Bobtown. Soon a terrific artillery duel began. The barrage was heard as far away as Winchester.

Cleburne's commander Gen. Edmund Kirby Smith, arrived with a plan to turn the Union flank at Mt. Zion Church. Kirby Smith's second division, under the command of Gen. Thomas J. Churchill, was ordered to march up a ravine formed by Mound Creek west of the State Road, a move that allowed them to escape detection by the Union soldiers near the church.

The maneuver worked. Around 10 a.m., the Confederates burst out of the ravine, charged across a field and hit the Union right flank. At the same time, the remainder of the Confederates attacked the Union left and center. The coordinated attacks by the veteran Confederate troops proved too much for Manson's raw soldiers. As one Confederate put it, "We charged
Good, Common-Sense Soldiering Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, March 30, 2012
2. Good, Common-Sense Soldiering Marker
through the open field in face of a perfect storm of bullets, and scattered the enemy like chaff before the wind."

Mound Creek ravine or as it is locally known, Churhill's draw, is just to the west of this location. Its position is marked by the tree line in front of you.

(sidebar)
When Gen. Edmund Kirby Smith arrived on the field just north of Kingston, he had already devised a solid, simple plan to defeat the Union soldiers facing his small army. According to historian Dean Warren Lambert: "What Kirby Smith was doing was simple, good, common-sense soldiering." The maneuver of sending half of Churchill's men up the ravine was a simple flanking move and it worked to perfection.
 
Location. 37° 39.878′ N, 84° 15.128′ W. Marker is in Richmond, Kentucky, in Madison County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Battlefield Memorial Highway (U.S. 421) and Hays Fork Lane, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. This marker is part of the Union Trail Interpreted Loop at Pleasant View Farm. Marker is in this post office area: Richmond KY 40475, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Union Trail (within shouting distance of this marker); Saving the Richmond Battlefield (about 300 feet away, measured
Churchill's Draw image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, March 30, 2012
3. Churchill's Draw
in a direct line); Battle of Richmond (about 400 feet away); a different marker also named The Battle of Richmond (about 400 feet away); Slavery at Pleasant View Farm (about 400 feet away); Sharpshooters Check The Union Right (about 500 feet away); Barnett Burial Ground (about 600 feet away); "The Loud Mouthed Dogs of War Were Unleashed" (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Richmond.
 
Also see . . .  Battle of Richmond Visitors Center. (Submitted on July 28, 2015.)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Churchill's Draw Sign image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, March 30, 2012
4. Churchill's Draw Sign
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 27, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 150 times since then and 36 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on July 27, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement