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Near Richmond in Madison County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

The Battle of Richmond

 
 
The Battle of Richmond Marker image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, May 12, 2010
1. The Battle of Richmond Marker
Inscription. August 23, 1862
BIG HILL Confederate Col. John Scott's cavalry defeats cavalry commanded by Col. Leonidas Metcalfe near the Cox house on Big Hill. The Confederate victory opens the road to Richmond.

August 29, 1862
ROGERSVILLE A newly recruited Union army of 6,500 commanded by Gen. Mahlon Manson confronts Scott at Rogersville, driving him from the field and capturing a cannon. Meanwhile, Confederate Gen. Edmund Kirby Smith's army of 7,000 battle-hardened veterans advances up the Old State Road.

BOBTOWN Metcalfe attacks Scott just south of Kingston. Scott flees south to Bobtown where Confederate Gen. Patrick Cleburne's infantry is deployed. After a short engagement Metcalfe retreats to Rogersville.

August 30, 1862
MT. ZION CHURCH Shortly after dawn Cleburne's artillery opens fire on Union troops near Mt. Zion Church. While trying to flank Cleburne Manson overextends his line. Confederate Gen. Thomas Churchill moves up unseen and attacks the western end of the Union line. The Federals break and retreat northward.

DUNCANNON ROAD The Union army reforms here, near Duncannon Road. Manson's and Gen. Charles Cruft's brigades are deployed on either side of the Old State Road. The
The Battle of Richmond Marker image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, May 12, 2010
2. The Battle of Richmond Marker
Confederates attack again and, once again, the Union line retreats in a disorganized rush toward Richmond.

RICHMOND CEMETERY Gen. William "Bull" Nelson arrives on the field and takes command of the Union army at the Richmond Cemetery. Nelson makes a stirring speech, asking the men to stop the Confederates until reinforcements arrive. The Confederates charge; Nelson is wounded but escapes capture. The Union line holds briefly but after firing two or three volleys, the men break and rush in panic toward Lexington.

AN OVERWHELMING CONFEDERATE VICTORY
The Battle of Richmond was the most complete Confederate victory of the Civil War. Nelson's army of 6,500 was destroyed; 1,050 men were killed or wounded and over 4,300 were taken prisoner. Gen. Edmund Kirby Smith eliminated the only fighting force between the Confederates and Frankfort. One week later Frankfort was captured; it was the only Union State capitol to fall during the war.
 
Erected by Civil War Discovery Trail.
 
Location. 37° 42.016′ N, 84° 15.861′ W. Marker is near Richmond, Kentucky, in Madison County. Marker is on Duncannon Road 0.1 miles west of Berea Road (U.S. 25/421), on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is
The Battle of Richmond Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, March 30, 2012
3. The Battle of Richmond Marker
Marker is the closest taken in the photo
located on a small service road just West of the intersection. Several related markers are also in this area. Marker is in this post office area: Richmond KY 40475, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Generals (here, next to this marker); "Rally, boys! Rally to the Colors!" (a few steps from this marker); "Defeat and Destruction Seemed Inevitable" (a few steps from this marker); Battle of Richmond, Ky. (approx. 0.9 miles away); Twitty's or Little Fort (approx. 0.9 miles away); Fort Estill (approx. 0.9 miles away); Daniel Boone's Trace (approx. 0.9 miles away); Daniel Boone's Trail (approx. 0.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Richmond.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 2, 2010, by Lee Hattabaugh of Capshaw, Alabama. This page has been viewed 715 times since then and 52 times this year. Last updated on July 27, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on June 2, 2010, by Lee Hattabaugh of Capshaw, Alabama.   3. submitted on July 27, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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