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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Beallsville in Montgomery County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Brewer Farmstead

 
 
Brewer Farmstead Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
1. Brewer Farmstead Marker
Inscription.

Family Farming

Dr. William Brewer acquired 583 acres in a land grant known as “Woodstock Manor,” in 1838. Woodstock was two miles from Dr. Brewer's primary residence, Aix-La-Chappell where he provided medical treatment to the local community and taught future physicians, including his son, Nicholas.

An avid farmer, Dr. Brewer was dedicated; to promoting agrarian improvements, such as crop rotation and the creation of local and state agricultural societies. Dr. Brewer promoted the cultivation of wheat to replace the inefficiencies created by the dominant tobacco culture in Montgomery County.

However, when Dr. Brewer's youngest son, George, established residence at Woodstock in 1850, he cultivated tobacco along with wheat. These crops were tended by enslaved persons owned by the Brewer family until 1864, when all slaves in Maryland were emancipated. At that time, two men and three women from this farm acquired their freedom.

By 1879, hired laborers worked for William George Brewer, son of George Brewer, and sole owner of the 400-acre farm. On his improved fields, he grew wheat, Indian corn, Irish potatoes, apple trees, and hay. He also maintained horses, cattle, swine and chickens. His hens laid over 350 eggs in 1880.

After tending the farm for over sixty years,
Brewer Farmstead Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
2. Brewer Farmstead Marker
William G. Brewer sold Woodstock in 1942, ending the family's farming tradition that had lasted 104 years.

Farmyard Structures

At its peak of operations this property included collection of 19th and 20th century buildings. All out-buildings, ranging slave quarters to several barns, sat directly behind the main house.

The spring house and the stone dwelling were built in the mid-19th century with Seneca sandstone, a material that ensured their longevity.

The three wood frame buildings reflect the growing mechanization of this farm in the early 20th century.  
 
Location. 39° 11.432′ N, 77° 25.233′ W. Marker is in Beallsville, Maryland, in Montgomery County. Marker is on Darnestown Road. Touch for map. In the Woodstock Equestrian Park, 20207 Darnestown Road On Rte. 28, 3/4 mile North of Beallsville. Marker is in this post office area: Beallsville MD 20839, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Equestrian Heritage (within shouting distance of this marker); African American Soldiers from Montgomery County (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Washington's Farm (approx. 0.7 miles away); In Loving Memory
Brewer Homes image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
3. Brewer Homes
The extended Brewer family lived in close proximity within the Medley District: William lived at Woodstock; his father; George, occupied Aix-La-Chapelle; and his uncle, Nicholas, maintained a residence at Greenwood. These properties still stand today directly off Darnestown Road.
Close-up of map on marker
(approx. 0.8 miles away); Beallsville (approx. 0.9 miles away); Seneca Stone Barn (approx. 1.3 miles away); Linden Farm (approx. 1.6 miles away); Historic Site [ B&O RR station] (approx. 2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Beallsville.
 
Categories. Agriculture
 
Fifteen Dollar Reward image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
4. Fifteen Dollar Reward
The toil of enslaved African Americans ensured the productivity of the Brewer farm. A slave was a very valuable asset. This runaway ad from 1800, for the return of the runaway Willoughby, a bondsman owned by Dr. William Brewer, shows the lengths to which a master would go to recover his property.
Close-up of image on marker
Farm Structures image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
5. Farm Structures
Structures shown as transparent are no longer standing.
Close-up of image on marker (Text Added)
Bank Barn image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
6. Bank Barn
Close-up of photo on marker
Equipment Storage image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
7. Equipment Storage
Close-up of photo on marker
Equipment Storage image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
8. Equipment Storage
Corn Crib image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
9. Corn Crib
Close-up of photo on marker
Log & Frame Buildings near Stone Dwelling image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
10. Log & Frame Buildings near Stone Dwelling
Close-up of photo on marker
Spring House image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
11. Spring House
Close-up of photo on marker
Spring House image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
12. Spring House
Dairy Barn & Silo image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
13. Dairy Barn & Silo
Close-up of photo on marker
Farm House & Spring House image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
14. Farm House & Spring House
Close-up of photo on marker
Stone Dwelling image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
15. Stone Dwelling
Close-up of photo on marker
Stone Dwelling image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
16. Stone Dwelling
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 9, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 276 times since then and 73 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16. submitted on August 9, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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