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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Volcano in Amador County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Chaw Sť Roundhouse

 
 
Chaw Sť Roundhouse Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, November 22, 2007
1. Chaw Sť Roundhouse Marker
Inscription. In a village, the roundhouse served as the center of ceremonial and social life. Constructed in 1974, the Chaw Sť roundhouse continues this tradition. With its door facing the east, towards the rising sun, four large oaks are the focal point of this sixty foot in diameter structure. Today, ceremonial roundhouses are the most significant architectural manifestation of the continuing Miwok spiritual heritage.

California Registered Historical Landmark No. 1001, an element of the thematic designation, California Native American Ceremonial Roundhouses.

Plaque placed by the State Department of Parks and Recreation in cooperation with the Sierra Native American Council and the Chaw Sť Association, October 14, 1974.
 
Erected 1994 by California State Department of Parks and Recreation. (Marker Number 1001.)
 
Location. 38° 25.489′ N, 120° 38.474′ W. Marker is in Volcano, California, in Amador County. Marker can be reached from Pine Grove Volcano Road. Touch for map. The marker is within Indian Grinding Rock State Historic Park, between the parking lot and the visitor center. Marker is in this post office area: Volcano CA 95689, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker
Chaw Se Roundhouse image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, November 22, 2007
2. Chaw Se Roundhouse
The roundhouse is constructed of cedar poles secured with grapevine, and topped with cedar bark. Inside is a fire pit. The roof is supported oak pillars. A fire exit was added in the rear of the structure in 1993, per state fire regulations. The door faces the east to catch the sunrise. The roundhouse is still used today, on occasion, for ceremonial dances.
, measured as the crow flies. Petroglyphs (Rock Carvings) ( about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Chaw'se ( about 400 feet away); Hun'ge ( about 700 feet away); Pine Grove ( approx. 1.2 miles away); Volcano Masonic Cave ( approx. 1.2 miles away); Moose Milk ( approx. 1.3 miles away); St. George Hotel ( approx. 1.3 miles away); General Store ( approx. 1.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Volcano.
 
More about this marker. Indian Grinding Rock State Historic Park preserves 135 acres of meadows and Valley Oak lands. The highlight of the park is a large limestone outcropping, containing 1,185 mortar holes, as well as some petroglyphs. In addition to this grinding rock, the park also contains a roundhouse, a regional Native American museum, and reproductions of Native American bark houses.
 
Also see . . .  The Rock and the People. The California Department of Parks and Recreation's web page for the grinding rock. (Submitted on June 30, 2008, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.) 
 
Categories. Native AmericansNotable Buildings
 
Chaw Se - The main grinding rock image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, November 22, 2007
3. Chaw Se - The main grinding rock
Chaw Sť, or alternatively, Chaw'Se, is the Miwok word for grinding rock. These mortar holes were used to grind acorns into meal.
Chaw Se - Grinding Rock image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, November 22, 2007
4. Chaw Se - Grinding Rock
Another view of the grinding rock. Note the faint presence of a number of petroglyphs. A number of these are thought to be 2,000 - 3,000 years old.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 30, 2008, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 2,524 times since then and 60 times this year. Last updated on July 2, 2008, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on June 30, 2008, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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