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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Memphis in Shelby County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Oakville Missionary Baptist Church

 
 
Oakville Missionary Baptist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Steve Masler, August 15, 2015
1. Oakville Missionary Baptist Church Marker
Inscription.
Front
Founded in 1871 and organized in 1872, this church is among Shelby County's oldest active African American congregations. Originally known as "Oakville Colored Church", it was organized by former slaves and their families and flourished during the Reconstruction period after the Civil War. Founder Rev. Rubin Reed was assisted by Reverends Morris Henderson, Dennis Morgan, Alfort Cohen, who furnished the later name (Oakville Baptist), Mose Henderson and Ben Love. The church thereafter was named in church records as the Oakville Missionary Baptist Church, but this name was never formally recorded as such in the county records. The property for the church was donated by the Edward LeMaster family with the understanding that it would always be used for a church or school.

Back
Most of the church history was recorded from the 1st administration in 1872 to the 17th administration in 1923, but little is known between 1924-1938. In 1938 Rev. Henry J. Thompson was elected pastor and served until 1980. Early in his tenure services were held in an old frame building, which served as a school during the week and a place of worship on Sundays. Membership grew under Reverend Thompson's leadership and, continuing with his successor Rev. Richmond Savage, several additions and renovations were made expanding

Oakville Missionary Baptist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Steve Masler, August 15, 2015
2. Oakville Missionary Baptist Church Marker
it to the edifice seen today. On this same property is the church graveyard, which includes markers of deceased members whose births pre-date the Emancipation Proclamation.
 
Erected 2015 by Oakville Missionary Baptist Church Congegation and Shelby County Historical Commission.
 
Location. 35° 3.745′ N, 89° 54.636′ W. Marker is in Memphis, Tennessee, in Shelby County. Marker is at the intersection of Knight Arnold Road and Knight Road, on the left when traveling west on Knight Arnold Road. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3167 Knight Rd., Memphis TN 38118, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Tragic Accident Sparks Sanitation Strike (approx. 2.2 miles away); Gen. James M. Kennedy Hospital (approx. 3.2 miles away); This Chimney Swift Tower (approx. 3.3 miles away); Crystal Shrine Grotto (approx. 3.6 miles away); William G. Leftwich, Jr. Memorial (approx. 3.7 miles away); Eudora Baptist Church (approx. 3.7 miles away); Normal Station Neighborhood (approx. 3.9 miles away); Memphis University School (approx. 3.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Memphis.
 
Additional comments.
1. Oakville Missionary
Oakville Missionary Baptist Church Marker Dedication image. Click for full size.
By Steve Masler, August 15, 2015
3. Oakville Missionary Baptist Church Marker Dedication
Baptist Church

This marker was unveiled on the 144th anniversary of the founding of Oakville Missionary Baptist Church in what is now known as the Parkway Village neighborhood of Memphis.
    — Submitted August 16, 2015, by Steve Masler of Memphis, Tennessee.

 
Categories. African AmericansCemeteries & Burial SitesChurches, Etc.
 
Oakville Missionary Baptist Church Marquis image. Click for full size.
By Steve Masler, August 15, 2015
4. Oakville Missionary Baptist Church Marquis
Oakville Missionary Baptist Church Sanctuary image. Click for full size.
By Steve Masler, August 15, 2015
5. Oakville Missionary Baptist Church Sanctuary
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 16, 2015, by Steve Masler of Memphis, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 170 times since then and 36 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on August 16, 2015, by Steve Masler of Memphis, Tennessee. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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