Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near French Camp in Attala County, Mississippi — The American South (East South Central)
 

Cole Creek

 
 
Cole Creek Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 5, 2015
1. Cole Creek Marker
Inscription. Forests are fascinating places – whole new worlds unfold to anyone who takes time to explore them.
     Across Cole Creek you will find a typical mixed hardwood forest. Here you can discover for yourself the many marvels in a bottomland forest which are more intriguing than you might suspect.
     Time means little in a forest but a 15-minute adventure along this short trail will take you through the last stage of a tupelo-baldcypress swamp and into the first stage of a mixed hardwood bottomland forest.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Natchez Trace marker series.
 
Location. 33° 13.741′ N, 89° 26.745′ W. Marker is near French Camp, Mississippi, in Attala County. Marker is on Natchez Trace Parkway (at milepost 175.6), 0.8 miles south of County Road 3122, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Mc Cool MS 39108, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 17 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Bethel Mission (approx. 0.6 miles away); Natchez Trace at French Camp (approx. 4.9 miles away); French Camp (approx. 4.9 miles away);
Cole Creek Marker Next to Nature Trail Head image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 5, 2015
2. Cole Creek Marker Next to Nature Trail Head
Col. James Drane (approx. 5.1 miles away); Hurricane Creek (approx. 11.1 miles away); MFWC Birthplace (approx. 14.5 miles away); Jeff Busby Park (approx. 16.6 miles away); The Great Eastern Hardwood Forest (approx. 16.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in French Camp.
 
Also see . . .  Natchez Trace Parkway. Official National Park Service website. (Submitted on August 21, 2015.) 
 
Categories. Environment
 
View to Northeast From Natchez Trace Parkway image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 5, 2015
3. View to Northeast From Natchez Trace Parkway
Marker is on right (east) side of parkway
Stairs Leading to the Cole Creek Nature Trail image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 5, 2015
4. Stairs Leading to the Cole Creek Nature Trail
Water Tupelo Tree image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 5, 2015
5. Water Tupelo Tree
Tupelo tree is left of the interpretive sign
Water Tupelo Interpretive Sign image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 5, 2015
6. Water Tupelo Interpretive Sign
Water tupelo thrives in lowlands and swamps because it can survive with its roots completely submerged under water. The swollen base, called a buttress, helps support the tree.
Cole Creek Swamp image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 5, 2015
7. Cole Creek Swamp
Baldcypress Tree image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 5, 2015
8. Baldcypress Tree
Bridge Across Swamp image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 5, 2015
9. Bridge Across Swamp
Baldcypress Interpretive Sign image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 5, 2015
10. Baldcypress Interpretive Sign
Another swamp lover, the baldcypress is easily recognized by its “knees.” It was once thought these “knees” were breathing organs, but it is now believed that they merely give additional support to the towering tree.
Trail at Mixed Hardwood Forest Interpretive Sign image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 5, 2015
11. Trail at Mixed Hardwood Forest Interpretive Sign
Mixed Hardwood Forest Interpretive Sign image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 5, 2015
12. Mixed Hardwood Forest Interpretive Sign
As the swamp is filled, other species of trees are able to survive and reproduce. Beech, hickory, red oak, chestnut oak, ash, elm, and many others comprise the mixed hardwood forest that is taking over the area.
Trail at Decay and Floods Interpretive Signs image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 5, 2015
13. Trail at Decay and Floods Interpretive Signs
Decay Interpretive Sign image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 5, 2015
14. Decay Interpretive Sign
Trees die and fall to the ground where insect larvae, beetles, and fungi aid the decay process. This decaying tree will become another small amount of humus in the soil, continually filling the swamp.
Low Lying Areas Flooded by Cole Creek image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 5, 2015
15. Low Lying Areas Flooded by Cole Creek
Floods Interpretive Sign image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 5, 2015
16. Floods Interpretive Sign
Still another method of filling in the swamp occurs when it floods. Soil from other areas is carried by Cole Creek which overflows into these low lying areas. As the water slows down the soil particles are deposited to form more soil.
Red Maple Trees image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 5, 2015
17. Red Maple Trees
Red Maples Interpretive Sign image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 5, 2015
18. Red Maples Interpretive Sign
The red maple is a transition tree between the swamp forest and the hardwood forest. It is able to sprout and grow in marshy areas and as these areas dry out it can survive with the other hardwoods.
Cole Creek Visible beyond the Brush image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 5, 2015
19. Cole Creek Visible beyond the Brush
Cole Creek Interpretive Sign image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 5, 2015
20. Cole Creek Interpretive Sign
Cole Creek will always be here. But as the swamp fills in and the hardwood forest becomes more established, the creek will be more and more limited to its banks. Someday the area will be a hardwood forest with a creek running through it, all evidence of the swamp gone.
Cole Creek image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 5, 2015
21. Cole Creek
View to north from bridge near end of nature trail
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 21, 2015, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. This page has been viewed 207 times since then and 32 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 21, 2015, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.   4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21. submitted on October 24, 2015, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.
Paid Advertisement