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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Yellowstone National Park in Park County, Wyoming — The American West (Mountains)
 

Emerald Spring

The Secret is Sulphur

 
 
Emerald Spring Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 29, 2015
1. Emerald Spring Marker
Inscription.
A hot spring’s color often indicates the presence of minerals. In a clear blue pool, the water is absorbing all the colors of sunlight except one – blue, which is reflected back to our eyes. Here in Emerald Spring’s pool, another factor joins with light refraction to give this spring its color. The 27-foot-deep pool (8 meters) is lined with yellow sulfur deposits. The yellow color from the sulfur combines with the reflected blue light, making the hot spring appear a magnificent emerald green.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Location. 44° 43.544′ N, 110° 42.247′ W. Marker is in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, in Park County. Marker can be reached from Grand Loop Road (U.S. 89). Touch for map. Marker is located in the Back Basin at the Norris Geyser Basin. Marker is in this post office area: Yellowstone National Park WY 82190, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Yellowstone National Park (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The National Park System (about 300 feet away); Norris Geyser Basin (about 300 feet away); a different marker also named Norris Geyser Basin
Emerald Spring Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 29, 2015
2. Emerald Spring Marker
(about 400 feet away); The Norris Area (about 500 feet away); Minute Geyser (about 500 feet away); Fumaroles (about 700 feet away); Steamboat Geyser (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Yellowstone National Park.
 
More about this marker. A photograph on the right side of the marker includes a caption of “Hot spring water and steam can dissolve and transport sulfur from underground. The mineral can deposit and crystallize at the earth’s surface – sometimes in hot spring pools.”
 
Categories. Natural Features
 
Marker at the Norris Geyser Basin image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 29, 2015
3. Marker at the Norris Geyser Basin
Emerald Spring & Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 29, 2015
4. Emerald Spring & Marker
Emerald Spring image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 29, 2015
5. Emerald Spring
<i>Emerald Spring, Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park</i> image. Click for full size.
Postcard by the Detroit Publishing Company, circa 1910
6. Emerald Spring, Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 10, 2015, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 143 times since then and 40 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on September 10, 2015, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   6. submitted on September 10, 2015.
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