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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
McLean Gardens in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Evalyn Walsh McLean and the Hope Diamond

 
 
Evalyn Walsh McLean and the Hope Diamond Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 13, 2015
1. Evalyn Walsh McLean and the Hope Diamond Marker
Inscription. A Cinderella world once existed behind the stone wall you see straight ahead, occupied by Evalyn Walsh McLean.

Evalyn was the only daughter of multimillionaire Thomas F. Walsh — he struck gold in Colorado — and Carrie Bell Reed, a schoolteacher. Evalyn's husband Edward Beale McLean owned The Washington Post after the death of his father, Post publisher John R. McLean. The McLeans lived in splendor here with their children, Vinson, Edward, John, and Emily (“Evalyn”) on 75 acres behind the wall. (Their mansion, Friendship, was demolished in 1942 for McLean Gardens.)

Evalyn moved easily in Washington's elite social circles, but was best known for wearing the fabulous 45.52-carat Hope Diamond as seen here in her portrait. The McLeans purchased the world's largest blue diamond in 1911 from Pierre Cartier of Paris. Wagging tongues and the Hope Diamond's supposed curse did not prevent Evalyn from wearing it everywhere, including to the White House and to her favorite charity events. She actually lost it a few times — once by putting it on Mike, her Great Dane, and another time by allowing her granddaughter, daughter of Senator Robert R. Reynolds (D-NC), to teethe on it.

According to the Smithsonian Institution — where the gem is displayed — there is no truth to the
Evalyn Walsh McLean and the Hope Diamond Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 13, 2015
2. Evalyn Walsh McLean and the Hope Diamond Marker
curse. But the tale persists, and perhaps that is why millions from all over the world come to see it. In the end the Hope Diamond brought good luck to the Smithsonian.
 
Location. 38° 56.285′ N, 77° 4.465′ W. Marker is in McLean Gardens, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of Wisconsin Avenue and Quebec Street, on the right when traveling south on Wisconsin Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3696 Wisconsin Avenue Northwest, Washington DC 20016, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Friendship Estate (within shouting distance of this marker); Washington National Cathedral (approx. half a mile away); Live on Our Stage! (approx. half a mile away); For the Children (approx. half a mile away); Winning the War (approx. half a mile away); Firehouse (approx. half a mile away); Why Are These Stones Here? (approx. half a mile away); All Hallows Guild (approx. half a mile away).
 
Categories. Man-Made Features
 
Evalyn Walsh McLean and the Hope Diamond image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 13, 2015
3. Evalyn Walsh McLean and the Hope Diamond
Painting by Philip Alexius Laszlo reproduced on the old police callbox.
The Hope Diamond image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 13, 2015
4. The Hope Diamond
Evalyn Walsh McLean wearing the Hope Diamond image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress, Harris & Ewing
5. Evalyn Walsh McLean wearing the Hope Diamond
The Hope Diamond<br>45.52 carats<br>India image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 26, 2015
6. The Hope Diamond
45.52 carats
India
"You are looking at one of the worlds most famous gems — renowned for its flawless clarity, rare deep blue color, and eventful history. It is surrounded by 16 white diamonds and suspended from a platinum chain bearing 46 more diamonds. (gift of Harry Winston 1958)" -- Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 26, 2017. This page originally submitted on September 17, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 477 times since then and 96 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on September 17, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   6. submitted on October 7, 2016, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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