Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Winchester, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Glen Burnie

 
 
Glen Burnie Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 21, 2015
1. Glen Burnie Marker
Inscription.
This Property Has Been
Placed on the
National Register
Of Historic Places

By the United States
Department of Interior

 
Location. 39° 11.223′ N, 78° 10.703′ W. Marker is in Winchester, Virginia. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 801 Amherst Street, Winchester VA 22601, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Glen Burnie (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Rear Admiral Richard E. Byrd (approx. 0.3 miles away); Daniel Morgan House (approx. half a mile away); Catherine B. Conrad (approx. half a mile away); Little-Holiday House (approx. 0.6 miles away); Thomas, Sixth Lord Fairfax of Cameron (approx. 0.6 miles away); Braddock Street Methodist Church (approx. 0.6 miles away); Sheridan’s Headquarters (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Winchester.
 
Also see . . .  Glen Burnie (pdf file). 1979 National Register Nomination Form. (Submitted on October 25, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. James Wood Senior

James Wood, Sr. (1707?-1759) was born, according to a grandson,
James Wood Sr. image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 21, 2015
2. James Wood Sr.

Home of
Colonel James Wood Sr.
First Clerk of the Court
Frederick County , Virginia 1743
Founder of Winchester 1744
Virginia Society of CDXVII Century
Note: CDXVII would be 417. CD here stands for Colonial Dames (of the 17th (XVII)) Century.
in Winchester, Hampshire, England. He attended Oxford University, was a lieutenant in the Royal Navy, and came to Virginia with one of the colonial governors. Around 1735, he acquired a tract of land "on the branches of the Opequon" from which, in 1744, a large part of Winchester was formed in accordance with his stipulations to the Justices of Frederick County. Wood was elected the first Clerk of the Frederick County Magistrate and Court and served in that position until his death. He was also a Colonel in the Frederick County militia and served with his friend Col. George Washington in the 1754 campaign against the French. In 1758, he was proxy for Washington in the latter’s candidacy for Burgess from Frederick County and wielded considerable political influence.


James Wood, Sr., built the first "Glen Burnie" in 1738. He married Mary Rutherford (died 1798) in 1738 with whom he had children Elizabeth (b. 1739), James, Jr. (b. 1741), Mary (b. 1742), John (b. 1743-44), and Robert (b. 1747). He is buried in the family graveyard at Glen Burnie. — Handley Regional Libary
    — Submitted October 25, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.

2. JamesWood Junior

James Wood, Jr. (1741-1813) was deputy surveyor of Frederick County and represented the county
James Wood, Jr. image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 21, 2015
3. James Wood, Jr.

Birthplace of
James Wood, Junior
Governor of Virginia
1796 – 1799 NSDAR – Fort Loudon Chapter – 1990
in the Virginia House of Burgesses from 1766 to 1776 and in the Virginia Constitutional Convention in 1776. He served as governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia from 1796 to 1799. Wood negotiated the Treaty of Fort Pitt with the Shawnee Indians in 1775, making possible the successful expedition of General George Rogers Clark. He fought in the Revolutionary War as a colonel, commanding the Virginia Regiment at the Battle of Brandywine; later, he was a Brigadier-General of Virginia troops. James Wood, Jr., married Jean Moncure in 1775; they had no children. — Handley Regional Libary
    — Submitted October 25, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.

 
Categories. Man-Made Features
 
Virginia Historic Landmark image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 21, 2015
4. Virginia Historic Landmark

Glen Burnie
Has been registered as a
Virginia
Historic
Landmark

pursuant to the authority vested in the
Virginia Historic Landmarks Commission
Act of 1966
Five Markers image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 21, 2015
5. Five Markers
Glen Burnie image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 21, 2015
6. Glen Burnie
Glen Burnie image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 21, 2015
7. Glen Burnie
Glen Burnie image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 21, 2015
8. Glen Burnie
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 25, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 255 times since then and 46 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on October 25, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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