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Irondequoit in Monroe County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

British Army Encampment

Prideaux's Campaign

 

—French & Indian War —

 
British Army Encampment Marker image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, October 31, 2015
1. British Army Encampment Marker
Inscription.
Bivouac
For two days, July 2nd and 3rd, 1759, a force of 3,000 soldiers under the command of Brigidier General John Prideaux camped here. The army was advancing along the lake on a campaign from Oswego to Four Mile Creek, near Fort Niagara. Here they prepared for the eventual seige of Fort Niagara by conducting artillery drills, cooking rations, and checking personal weapons.
Bird's Eye View of the Bay and Encampment from the North
Loaded bateaux were hidden in the bay to avoid detection by French lake patrols.
Camps were specifically arranged to insure unit integrity and allow quick and easy movement for unit assemblies and response to enemy attacks.
Light infantry guarded the land side of the camp.
Remains of Fort de Sables? The soldiers may have found evidence of earlier occupation. French fur trader Louis Thomas de Joncaire built a fur trading post here in 1716.
American Indians probably built brush shelters on site.
Basic Shelter
Officers and men lodged in tents. Officer marquees, resembling small circus tents, provided more space compared to the enlisted mens' wedge tents. Captains and above had their own marquee, while lieutenants and ensigns billeted two to a tent. Five elisted men would share one wedge tent.
Food Preparation
While here, five-man groups
Left image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, October 31, 2015
2. Left
were ordered to form a mess and prepare and cook a four day supply of food for the entire force. Food items commonly issued were beef, pork, peas, beans, rice and bread. Food was boiled in single cooking kettles over open fires.
Weapons Inspection
The soldiers' Brown Bess muskets were regularly inspected by a company grade officer to insure they were fully operational and clean. Orders stated that "all the mens' arms and cartouche boxes" were to be laid out so that "at a moments warning" the men could be battle ready.
Artillery Drills
A detachment of Royal Artillery was responsible for the cannon, howitzers, and mortars. Under the command of Captain Samuel Strachey, the artillerymen kept the guns operational.

Early European Visitation
1759 Brigadier General John Prideaux's army camps here on its way to attack Fort Niagara.
1756 Captain John Bradstreet proposes once again to build "a fort and trading house" to secure Iroquois allegiance, but again no fort is built.
1754 English consider building a fort to counter French pressure on Seneca for their allegiance against the English, but fail to do so.
1721 English build Fort Schuyler nearby to compete with French fur trading efforts.
1716 Fort de Sables established by French merchant Thomas de Joncaire as a fur trading post to trade with Seneca.
1669 French explorer
Right image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, October 31, 2015
3. Right
Robert Cavelier Lasalle visits on August 12.

Major military campaigns followed the Great Lakes Seaway Trail.
 
Erected by Seaway Trail, Inc.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Great Lakes Seaway Trail National Scenic Byway marker series.
 
Location. 43° 14.089′ N, 77° 32.098′ W. Marker is in Irondequoit, New York, in Monroe County. Marker is on Culver Road (County Route 120) 0.2 miles east of Sea Breeze drive, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is at the northeast terminus of Culver Road before the swing bridge across the mouth of Irondequoit Bay to the town of Webster. The swing bridge is left open during boating season. Marker is in this post office area: Rochester NY 14622, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Seneca People (here, next to this marker); Fort Des Sables (approx. 0.4 miles away); On This Site - Over the Years (approx. 0.4 miles away); a different marker also named On This Site - Over the Years (approx. 0.4 miles away); a different marker also named On This Site - Over the Years (approx. 0.4 miles away); a different
Towards Northeast image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, October 31, 2015
4. Towards Northeast
marker also named On This Site - Over the Years (approx. 0.4 miles away); a different marker also named On This Site - Over the Years (approx. 0.4 miles away); a different marker also named On This Site - Over the Years (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Irondequoit.
 
Categories. ExplorationWar, French and Indian
 
Eastward image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, October 31, 2015
5. Eastward
Towards open swing bridge, mouth of Irondequoit Bay.
Westward From Culver Road Terminus image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, October 31, 2015
6. Westward From Culver Road Terminus
The black backside of the marker is in front of the closest vehicle at right.
Southward image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, October 31, 2015
7. Southward
Irondequoit Bay
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 4, 2015, by Anton Schwarzmueller of Wilson, New York. This page has been viewed 281 times since then and 51 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on November 4, 2015, by Anton Schwarzmueller of Wilson, New York.
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