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Mexico in Juniata County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

First White Settlement in the Juniata Valley

 
 
First White Settlement in the Juniata Valley Marker-Side 1 image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, November 8, 2015
1. First White Settlement in the Juniata Valley Marker-Side 1
Inscription.
Side 1
Several years in advance of other European settlers, Frederick Staring (Starns) led a small band of fellow countrymen from German Flatts in the Mohawk Valley of NY in 1741 to boldly locate themselves here in the valley of the Juniata.

“About the year 1740 or 1741, one Frederick Star (Starns), a German, with two or three more of his countrymen, made some settlements at the above place…on Big Juniata, situated at the distance of twenty-five miles from the mouth thereof, and about ten miles north of the Blue Hills, a place much esteemed by the Indians for some of their best hunting grounds..”

The settlers were discovered by the Delawares at Shamokin who complained in 1742 to Governor Thomas in Philadelphia, via the Six Nation Council deputies, alleging that this was a breach of the 1682 treaty with William Penn and subsequent confirming treaties. Richard Peters, Secretary to the proprietors, under a proclamation from the Germans to be driven out in June, 1743.

Side 2
After his eviction here, Frederick Starns, with his wife, daughter and five of his six sons, arrived in Southwest VA and took up land on the New River in the spring of 1744. He became the progenitor of all the large, old Southern family Starns/Starnes of German descent.

Valentine Staring (Starns), eldest son of Frederick,

First White Settlement in the Juniata Valley Marker-Side 2 image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, November 8, 2015
2. First White Settlement in the Juniata Valley Marker-Side 2
stayed in Pennsylvania with his wife Jean’s kin, the Conynghams, and later claimed his father’s settlement land, surveyed as 535 acres. He died here, Feb. 15, 1761, naming his father Frederick, brothers Frederick and Leonard in his will. To his nephew John, he left “one hundred acres of my land: upon Juniate.”

John Starns of Mecklenburg County, NC on June 19 1776 sold this one hundred acres to Thomas Rankin of Cumberland County, PA for one hundred and eighty pounds. Capt. John Starns, Mecklenburg County, NC Militia was killed Aug 16, 1780 in the Revolutionary War Battle of Camden, SC.

Jean Conyngham Starns, Valentine’s widow, sold one hundred acres of land “situated in Fermanagh Township in the County of Mifflin” to John Rankin of Mifflin County, Oct 5, 1796.
 
Location. 40° 32.183′ N, 77° 21.146′ W. Marker is in Mexico, Pennsylvania, in Juniata County. Marker is at the intersection of Front Street and William Penn Highway (PA 3002) on Front Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Mexico PA 17056, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Mexico (a few steps from this marker); Patterson's Fort (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Fort Bigham

First White Settlement in the Juniata Valley Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, November 8, 2015
3. First White Settlement in the Juniata Valley Marker
(approx. one mile away); Juniata County (approx. 3.3 miles away); Juniata County War Memorial (approx. 3.3 miles away); John Harris (approx. 3.3 miles away); Civil War Memorial (approx. 3.3 miles away); Westminster Presbyterian Cemetery World War Memorial Avenue of Trees (approx. 3.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Mexico.
 
Categories. Native AmericansSettlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 19, 2015, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 290 times since then and 102 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 19, 2015, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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