Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Junction in Kimble County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Campsite of Marques de Rubi, 1767

 
 
Campsite of Marques de Rubi, 1767 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, May 15, 2012
1. Campsite of Marques de Rubi, 1767 Marker
Inscription. In 1764 King Charles III of Spain ordered the Marques de Rubi, a Spanish army field marshal, to tour and inspect all presidios in New Spain.

Rubi arrived in Mexico in February 1766, and was joined by Nicolas de Lafora, engineer and mapmaker. They made a tour of the Northwest and California territory and entered Texas on July 17, 1767. Rubi chose this location for his campsite July 23, 1767.

His report suggested small Texas missions be closed. This was done in 1772. Only Goliad and San Antonio remained.
 
Erected 1967 by State Historical Survey Commitee. (Marker Number 1188.)
 
Location. 30° 31.274′ N, 99° 49.39′ W. Marker is near Junction, Texas, in Kimble County. Marker is on Ranch to Market Road 1674 1.2 miles west of County Route 271, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Junction TX 76849, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Old Bear Creek Texas Ranger Camp (here, next to this marker); Isaac Kountz (approx. 3.6 miles away); Vicinity of Bradbury Settlement (approx. 3.7 miles away); Major William Addison Spencer
Campsite of Marques de Rubi, 1767 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, May 15, 2012
2. Campsite of Marques de Rubi, 1767 Marker
Marker on left
(approx. 4.1 miles away); John Sterling Durst (approx. 4.1 miles away); Coke R. Stevenson (approx. 4.1 miles away); Colonel John Griffith (approx. 4.1 miles away); Burt M. Fleming Memorial (approx. 4.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Junction.
 
Categories. ExplorationHispanic AmericansSettlements & Settlers
 
View of Bear Creek Looking South image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, May 15, 2012
3. View of Bear Creek Looking South
The mouth of Bear Creek as it empties into the North Llano River is just 1/3 of a mile south of the marker and no doubt part of the reason the camp was located here
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 21, 2015, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. This page has been viewed 172 times since then and 61 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 21, 2015, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement