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Cody in Park County, Wyoming — The American West (Mountains)
 

John Jeremiah “Liver Eating” Johnston

1824 - 1900

 
 
John Jeremiah "Liver Eating" Johnston Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 13, 2015
1. John Jeremiah "Liver Eating" Johnston Marker
Inscription. John Johnston was born of Scotch-English descent in New Jersey in 1824. Johnston, described as a 6'6", 250 pound giant , came west in the early 1840's as a tapper. He began his career in the Medicine Bow mountains of Wyoming, gradually working his way northward through the Wind River, Owl Creek, and Absaroka Mountains, then into the Yellowstone Region and Montana.
About 1850 Johnston had acquired a Flathead Indian wife, of whom he was very fond, and had built a cabin on the Little Snake River of Wyoming. One day, on returning from trapping, he found his wife and unborn child dead and mutilated on the cabin floor. They had been killed by Crow Indians.
This started a personal revenge war against the Crows, which lasted nearly twelve years. According to legend, Johnston would on occasion remove the liver from a dead enemy and take a bite of it, or pretend to, in order to make a fierce impression on his savage foes. Consequently, he received the name "Liver Eating" Johnston.
Johnston went to Colorado in 1862 and enlisted in the Second Colorado Cavalry to fight in the Civil War. He was wounded in Missouri at the Battle of Newtonia, but remained in the service until his Honorable Discharge on September 23, 1865.
The winter after the war was spent in Fort Laramie, Wyoming where he was hired to help supply buffalo
John Jeremiah "Liver Eating" Johnston Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 13, 2015
2. John Jeremiah "Liver Eating" Johnston Marker
and elk meat for the Army post.
Johnston worked his way north to the Missouri River in Montana where he started a wood yard, supplying firewood for the steamboats that were traveling the river in those days.
In 1868, a the mouth of the Musselshell River, Johnston and some companions defeated a Sioux war party that intended to wipe out the group of trappers and wood cutters.
In 1877 Johnston became Chief of Scouts for General Nelson A. Miles. Johnston and ten scouts were credited with saving Miles command in a battle with the Cheyenne on Muddy Creek in 1877.
Johnston became the first Marshal at Coulson (Billings) Montand (sic) in 1882, and later in 1888, the first Sheriff of Red Lodge, Montana.
In old age he developed rheumatism, and in the late 1890's would treat his ailment at the DeMaris Hot Springs, near the river just below the site of Old Trail Town. His camping spot was just beneath the cliffs that can be seen from the grave site.
In the winter of 1899 Johnston's health failed him and he was sent to the old soldiers home in Santa Monica, California, where he died January 21, 1900.
"Liver Eating" Johnston, also known as Jeremiah Johnston from the Warner Bros. movie based on his life, was reburied near the mountains he loved on June 8, 1974.
The reburial was made possible through the efforts of Tri Robinson and his
Robert Redford, a pallbearer at the reburial of John Johnston image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 13, 2015
3. Robert Redford, a pallbearer at the reburial of John Johnston
seventh grade class of Lancaster, California.
The bronze statue of Johnston was sculpted by Peter Fillerup of Cody, Wyoming and donated by Larry Clark of Salt Lake City, Utah.
 
Erected by Old Trail Town.
 
Location. 44° 30.917′ N, 109° 6.312′ W. Marker is in Cody, Wyoming, in Park County. Marker can be reached from Demaris Drive near West Yellowstone Avenue (U.S. 14). Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1831 Demaris Drive, Cody WY 82414, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Jim White (here, next to this marker); Phillip H. Vetter (here, next to this marker); Sampson E. Stilwell (a few steps from this marker); W.A. Gallagher and Blind Bill (a few steps from this marker); Belle Drewry (a few steps from this marker); Trail to Old Cody City (within shouting distance of this marker); Lee Street – Cody City (within shouting distance of this marker); Stone Circles (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Cody.
 
More about this marker. John "Jeremiah" Johnston is buried in the cemetery located at the west end of Old Trail Town.
 
Related marker. Click here for
John Jeremiah "Liver Eating" Johnston image. Click for full size.
By By J.H. Fouch - Public Domain
4. John Jeremiah "Liver Eating" Johnston
"Liver Eating" Johnson c. 1876 This image is the first known photograph of Johnston. He was on scout duty during the 1876-1877 Sioux campaign in the Montana Territory.
another marker that is related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. Liver-Eating Johnson ~ Wikipedia. (Submitted on November 27, 2015, by Keith S Smith of West Chester, Pennsylvania.)
2. John Liver Eating Johnston Website. (Submitted on November 27, 2015, by Keith S Smith of West Chester, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial Sites
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 27, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 412 times since then and 131 times this year. Last updated on November 27, 2015, by Keith S Smith of West Chester, Pennsylvania. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 27, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.   4. submitted on November 27, 2015, by Keith S Smith of West Chester, Pennsylvania. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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