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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Pattenburg in Hunterdon County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

“Liver Eating” Johnson

 
 
"Liver Eating" Johnson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Alan Edelson, May 23, 2010
1. "Liver Eating" Johnson Marker
Inscription. John Garrison, later known as John Johnston, born here c. 1830. Killed many of the Crow Tribe, slayers of his Indian wife. Robert Redford movie “Jeremiah Johnson” popularized his life.
 
Erected 2010 by Hunterdon County Cultural and Heritage Commission.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the New Jersey, Hunterdon County Cultural and Heritage Commission marker series.
 
Location. 40° 37.541′ N, 75° 2.384′ W. Marker is in Pattenburg, New Jersey, in Hunterdon County. Marker is at the intersection of Bloomsbury Road (County Route 579 at milepost 33.5) and Pattenburg Road (County Route 614), on the right when traveling west on Bloomsbury Road. Touch for map. Sign is only visible (on the right) while traveling Route 579 Northbound. Marker is in this post office area: Milford NJ 08848, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Hickory Corners (within shouting distance of this marker); Lieutenant Hooper Road (approx. 1˝ miles away); Bellewood Park (approx. 1.6 miles away); Pattenburg United Methodist Church (approx. 1.6 miles away); Little York
"Liver Eating" Johnson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Alan Edelson, May 23, 2010
2. "Liver Eating" Johnson Marker
(approx. 1.7 miles away); West Portal Methodist Church (approx. 2 miles away); Hannah's Rock (approx. 2.2 miles away); Musconetcong (was approx. 2.2 miles away but has been reported missing. ). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Pattenburg.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. Wikipedia entry for Liver Eating Johnson. Excerpt: “Rumors, legends, and campfire tales abound about Johnson. Perhaps chief among them is this one: In 1847, his Native American wife was killed by the Crow people, which prompted Johnson to embark on an almost 12-year vendetta against the tribe. The legend says that he would cut out and eat the liver of each man killed. This was an insult to Crow being that the Crow Indians used to eat the raw livers from their game because they believed it gave them the vitality of the animal that they ate. In any case, he eventually became known as ‘Liver-Eating Johnson.’ The story of how he got his name was written down by a diarist at the time. There were three Johnsons, nicknames were commonplace, and with Johnson’s show of eating the liver, he received
"Liver Eating" Johnson Gravesite in Cody, Wyoming image. Click for more information.
Billy Hathorn, used under Wikipedia Creative Commons license 3.0, August 6, 2006
3. "Liver Eating" Johnson Gravesite in Cody, Wyoming
his name.” (Submitted on May 28, 2010, by Alan Edelson of Union Twsp., New Jersey.) 

2. Comprehensive Biography -. (Submitted on January 12, 2012, by Keith S Smith of West Chester, Pennsylvania.)
3. Liver Eating Johnston - "Damn Interesting" Website. (Submitted on November 27, 2015, by Keith S Smith of West Chester, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. Native AmericansNotable Persons
 
"Liver Eating" Johnson c. 1876 image. Click for full size.
By J.H. Fouch - Public Domain
4. "Liver Eating" Johnson c. 1876
This image is the first known photograph of Johnston. He was on scout duty during the 1876-1877 Sioux campaign in the Montana Territory.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 23, 2010, by Alan Edelson of Union Twsp., New Jersey. This page has been viewed 4,454 times since then and 165 times this year. Last updated on November 28, 2015, by Keith S Smith of West Chester, Pennsylvania. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on May 23, 2010, by Alan Edelson of Union Twsp., New Jersey.   4. submitted on January 12, 2012, by Keith S Smith of West Chester, Pennsylvania. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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