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Near Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Third Brigade

Second Division - Cavalry Corps

 

—Army of the Potomac —

 
Army of the Potomac Calvary Corps Second Division Third Brigade Marker image. Click for full size.
By Henry T. McLin
1. Army of the Potomac Calvary Corps Second Division Third Brigade Marker
Inscription.
Army of the Potomac
Cavalry Corps Second Division
Third Brigade

Col. J. Irvin Gregg
1st Maine (10 cos.) 10th New York
4th, 16th Pennsylvania Cavalry

July 2 Arrived and took position on Hanover Road 2 miles from Gettysburg in proximity to Lieut. Gen. Ewell's Corps about 11 a.m. Two regiments of infantry from Eleventh Corps were in front as skirmishers. They were withdrawn about 3 p.m. and 10th New York deployed in their place. Confederate sharpshooters from hill and woods in front were annoying. Fifty dismounted men were ordered to drive them back but were themselves met by a superior force until checked and forced back by the First Brigade

July 3 Took position in morning on Baltimore Pike and moved to the right near Hanover Road. Not engaged in Cavalry fight except one section of Batteries E & G 1st U.S. Lieut J. Chester Ordered to the left to meet a threatened attack.

July 4 Made a reconnaissance to Hunterstown and forced in Confederate pickets

Casualties Killed 6 men. Wounded 12 men. Captured or missing 1 officer 2 men. Total 21
 
Erected 1912 by Gettysburg National Military Park Commission.
 
Location. 39° 49.088′ N, 77° 10.166′ W. Marker is near
Third Brigade Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 23, 2015
2. Third Brigade Marker
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker is at the intersection of East Cavalry Avenue and Hanover Road (Pennsylvania Route 116), on the right when traveling north on East Cavalry Avenue. Touch for map. Located at the south entrance to the East Cavalry Battlefield section of the Gettysburg National Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Battery M, Second U.S. Artillery (within shouting distance of this marker); First Maine Cavalry (within shouting distance of this marker); Batteries E & G First U.S. Artillery (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Second Brigade (approx. 0.2 miles away); Battery H, 3d Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named Batteries E & G First U.S. Artillery (approx. 0.3 miles away); 1st Regiment Maryland Cavalry (approx. 0.6 miles away); Michigan Cavalry Brigade (approx. 0.6 miles away); Co. A Purnell Legion (approx. 0.6 miles away); a different marker also named Second Brigade (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. Brevet Major General John Irvin Gregg. Short biographical sketch of General Gregg from author Eric Wittenberg. (Submitted on July 13, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
South Entrance to the East Cavalry Battlefield image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
3. South Entrance to the East Cavalry Battlefield
At the south entrance to the East Cavalry Battlefield are the Battery M, 2nd US Artillery tablet (closest to the camera); Third Brigade (Gregg), 2nd Division, Cavalry Corps Tablet (to the right along the road); and the 1st Maine Cavalry Monument (background along the Hanover Road).
 

2. John Irvin Gregg. John Irvin Gregg (July 19, 1826 – January 6, 1892) was a career U.S. Army officer. He fought in the Mexican-American War and during the American Civil War as a general officer in the Union army. (Submitted on November 26, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. John Irvin Gregg - Find-a-grave. Civil War Union Brevet Major General. A veteran of the Mexican War, he served as a Captain in 11th US Infantry who stood 6'4" tall and was called "Long John" by the men who served under his command. (Submitted on November 26, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Third Brigade Tablet image. Click for full size.
By Henry T. McLin
4. Third Brigade Tablet
Located at the entrance to the East Cavalry Battlefield.
Third Brigade Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 23, 2015
5. Third Brigade Marker
Col. John Irvin Gregg (1826-1892) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
6. Col. John Irvin Gregg (1826-1892)
He led the Third Brigade at the battles of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg in a division commanded by his cousin David Gregg.
Gregg's Brigade Position image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, April 12, 2008
7. Gregg's Brigade Position
Looking west from the tablet location. For most of July 3, 1863, Gregg's Brigade occupied positions to the west of the tablet location, along Hanover Road, seen here on the left side of the photo. Monuments to the regiments in the brigade are posted from near the south entrance to the East Cavalry Battlefield (1st Maine Cavalry), westward to near the modern US Highway 15 bypass (10th New York Cavalry). The 16th Pennsylvania Cavalry Monument stands on Highland Avenue even further to the west of the Highway 15 bypass.

The placement of these monuments gives some measure of the distances covered by a cavalry brigade active in flank screening operations during a major battle.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 13, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 902 times since then and 13 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on January 1, 2009, by Henry T. McLin of Hanover, Pennsylvania.   2. submitted on November 26, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on July 13, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4. submitted on January 1, 2009, by Henry T. McLin of Hanover, Pennsylvania.   5, 6. submitted on November 26, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   7. submitted on July 13, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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