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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Bridgeport in Fairfield County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Bridgeport

 
 
Bridgeport Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, December 24, 2015
1. Bridgeport Marker
Inscription.
Bridgeport
"The Park City"
The area that is now Bridgeport was settled in the mid-17th century by farmers from the older towns of Stratford and Fairfield. Centers of settlement were Stratfield, present North Avenue; Pembroke, now Old Mill Green; and Newfield, present downtown. The site of Bridgeport was owned by the Pequonnock or Golden Hill band of the Paugussett Indian tribe. In 1695 the settlers of the area established a church, Pequonnock Parish. Newfield was renamed Bridgeport and made a borough of the Town of Stratford in 1800. Bridgeport became an independent town in 1821, and in 1836 was chartered as a city. Municipal bonds helped bring the Housatonic Railroad to Bridgeport. The city's success was due to its location on a good harbor and favorable railroad connections. With the introduction of steam power, harbor commerce was supplanted by manufacturing as the mainstay of the economy.

( back )
Bridgeport was made the county seat of Fairfield County in 1853. By the end of the Civil War, a thriving sewing machine industry had developed. Bridgeport was the birthplace of the midget Tom Thumb, the residence of showman Phineas Taylor Barnum, and the home of his circus winter quarters. Immigrants from many states and countries settled here, found work, built homes and raised families. Manufacturing
Bridgeport Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, December 24, 2015
2. Bridgeport Marker
( back )
in this heavily industrialized city aided the Allied cause during two world wars. From 1933 to 1957, local politics were dominated by the Socialist mayor, Jasper McLevy. Large areas of the city underwent urban renewal in the 1960s. Since 1974 the largest city in Connecticut, Bridgeport today is part of the New York metropolitan area, yet remains a city of homes and neighborhoods.

Erected by the City of Bridgeport
the Bridgeport Public Library
and the Connecticut Historical Commission
1981
 
Erected 1981 by City of Bridgeport, Bridgeport Public Library, Connecticut Historical Commission.
 
Location. 41° 10.594′ N, 73° 11.428′ W. Marker is in Bridgeport, Connecticut, in Fairfield County. Marker is at the intersection of Broad Street and State Street, on the right when traveling south on Broad Street. Touch for map. Located in front of the Margaret E. Morton Goverment Center. Marker is at or near this postal address: 999 Broad Street, Bridgeport CT 06604, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Bridgeport Veterans Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Bryant Electric Company World War I Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Bridgeport World War II Memorial
Bridgeport Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, December 24, 2015
3. Bridgeport Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); Bridgeport Korean War Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Lewis Howard Latimer (within shouting distance of this marker); Bridgeport Vietnam War Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Bryant Electric Company World War II Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Abraham Lincolnís Visit (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Bridgeport.
 
Also see . . .
1. City of Bridgeport Website. (Submitted on December 26, 2015, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
2. Bridgeport, Connecticut on Wikipedia. (Submitted on December 26, 2015, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
 
Categories. Colonial EraIndustry & CommerceSettlements & Settlers
 
Margaret E. Morton Goverment Center image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, December 24, 2015
4. Margaret E. Morton Goverment Center
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 26, 2015, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 364 times since then and 51 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on December 26, 2015, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.
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