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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Lindale in Smith County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Hubbard Family Cemetery

 
 
Hubbard Family Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Randal B. Gilbert, December 26, 2015
1. Hubbard Family Cemetery Marker
Inscription. This site once overlooked the plantation home of Richard B. Hubbard (1800-1864) and his wife Serena Carter, who came here from Georgia in 1854. They operated a prosperous 720-acre plantation with 44 slaves. Their son Richard Bennett Hubbard (1832-1901), later a governor of Texas, had graduated from Harvard Law School and set up his practice in Tyler.

While young Hubbard served with the Confederate army during the Civil War, his wife and children moved to the plantation. His twin daughters Mattie and Hattie died in 1863 and were buried on this hill. Also interred here are Hubbard's father, his infant daughter Claudia and his wife Eliza (d. 1868). The last interment was his nine-year-old son Bennie in 1877. Slave burials are marked with ironstone in this family plot.

Hubbard served as lieutenant governor, 1874-1876, and governor, 1876-1879. He was a railroad promoter and a leader in the state and national Democratic Party. President Grover Cleveland appointed him United States Minister to Japan. During his service there, 1885-1890, his second wife Janie Roberts died of cholera. She and Hubbard, along with other members of the family, are buried in Tyler's Oakwood Cemetery.
 
Erected 1978 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 7735.)
 
Location.
Hubbard Family Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Randal B. Gilbert, December 26, 2015
2. Hubbard Family Cemetery Marker
32° 30.395′ N, 95° 27.883′ W. Marker is near Lindale, Texas, in Smith County. Marker is on Pineview Lane 0.3 miles west of Leisure Lane, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. This marker and cemetery are in the private gated village of Hide-a-Way and visitors must be cleared by a guard. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1712 Pineview Lane, Lindale TX 75771, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Duck Creek Soil Erosion Project (approx. 3.1 miles away); Site of Flora (approx. 3.2 miles away); Whisenhunt-Kinzie House (approx. 3.3 miles away); Vial-Fragosa Trail (approx. 5.5 miles away); Milburn-Gary House (approx. 5.8 miles away); Flewellen-Thweatt Cemetery (approx. 5.8 miles away); Sabine Methodist Church (approx. 5.9 miles away); Damascus Baptist Church (approx. 6.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lindale.
 
Regarding Hubbard Family Cemetery. The Men's Garden Club of Hide-a-Way has meticulously restored this cemetery and marked and outlined the slave graves.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesPoliticsSettlements & Settlers
 
Hubbard Family Cemetery Slave Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Randal B. Gilbert, December 26, 2015
3. Hubbard Family Cemetery Slave Memorial
Graves of the Hubbard's plantation
workers (then known as slaves)
are randomly located in the
eastern portion of this site.
Each grave is marked with a single
iron-ore rock as a headstone
with no indication as to the
front or back side.
Side rocks were added later.
Hubbard Family Cemetery Slave Graves image. Click for full size.
By Randal B. Gilbert, December 26, 2015
4. Hubbard Family Cemetery Slave Graves
Some of the carefully marked graves of the Hubbard slaves. There are many more in this cemetery.
Both of the brothers-in-law of the elder Hubbard, J.S. Bledsoe and Milton Carter, were Baptist ministers and lived down the road from this location. In about 1854 they founded the Carmel Baptist Church about three miles north. The church allowed slaves to be members and their names are listed in the church minute books. In 1865 Bledsoe purchased land and built the new freedmen their own church, which is named Duck Creek Baptist Church. It still exists as a church.
Hubbard Family Plot Monument image. Click for full size.
By Randal B. Gilbert, December 26, 2015
5. Hubbard Family Plot Monument
The obelisk lists the Hubbard family members who are buried inside the chained area. Note that there are three more slave graves immediately adjacent to the Hubbard graves
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 20, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 26, 2015, by Randal B. Gilbert of Tyler, Texas. This page has been viewed 208 times since then and 83 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on December 26, 2015, by Randal B. Gilbert of Tyler, Texas. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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