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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Ocala in Marion County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Fort King Burying Ground

 
 
Fort King Burying Ground Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tim Fillmon, January 28, 2016
1. Fort King Burying Ground Marker
Inscription. This marks the burying ground of the soldiers and civilians who died at Fort King during the Seminole War 1835-1842.

Fort King occupied the hill to the north-east and was established as a military post in 1827.
 
Erected 1933 by Ocala Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution marker series.
 
Location. 29° 11.19′ N, 82° 5.061′ W. Marker is in Ocala, Florida, in Marion County. Marker is at the intersection of East Fort King Street and Southeast 39th Avenue, on the right when traveling west on East Fort King Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Ocala FL 34470, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 7 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Fort King (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Marion County Confederate Memorial Marker (approx. 1.1 miles away); Ocala (approx. 3 miles away); Ocala Demands (approx. 3.1 miles away); The Old Courthouse Square (approx. 3.2 miles away); Evergreen Cemetery (approx. 3.4 miles away); Brick City Fever (approx. 6 miles away).
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesForts, Castles
 
Fort King Burying Ground Marker with flags in background image. Click for full size.
By Tim Fillmon, January 28, 2016
2. Fort King Burying Ground Marker with flags in background
Tour Stop #17 about Fort King image. Click for full size.
By Tim Fillmon, January 28, 2016
3. Tour Stop #17 about Fort King
Saving Fort King
In 1927, eighty years after Fort King had been dismantled to serve as Marion County's first courthouse, a group of courageous women, dressed in black, approached the site from the west.

But unlike the armed soldiers that approached the site many years earlier, these women came armed with pens. And with those pens, they signed a title transaction that deeded one acre of the Fort King site over to them, thus ensuring preservation of the site forever.

These were members of the Ocala Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution, a group intent on preserving one of America's most historical sites. These women began the endeavor of "Saving Fort King”.

Years later more citizens came forward demanding the site be preserved. Following archeological confirmation on the exact location of the fort on the hill behind you, the site was declared a National Historic Landmark in 2004.

Today, this landmark and the surrounding living history park come alive through dedicated volunteers and groups. Stop and reflect as you visit these hallowed grounds.

www.fkha.org
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 25, 2017. This page originally submitted on March 12, 2016, by Tim Fillmon of Webster, Florida. This page has been viewed 198 times since then and 54 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on March 12, 2016, by Tim Fillmon of Webster, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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