Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Milford Center in Union County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Bridgeport / Bridgeport Iron Bridge

 
 
Bridgeport Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, March 28, 2016
1. Bridgeport Marker
close up
Inscription.
Bridgeport
In 1840, the first of several bridges was constructed at this location, which became known as "Bridgeport." In the early 1800s, this locality consisted of a group of log houses, a blacksmith shop, and a wagon shop. Several schools have been built here throughout the years. The first school was a one-room round log structure with clapboard roof and stick chimney. Inside, the school contained slab benches without backs and planks pinned to the logs in the walls for desks. A Liberty Party meeting, advocating the abolition of slavery, was held at this schoolhouse in 1844. In later years, Fairbanks School, named in honor of Union County native Vice President Charles W. Fairbanks was built in 1962.

Bridgeport Iron Bridge
The Bridgeport Iron Bridge, often called the Streng Road Iron Bridge, was built in 1914. It replaced a wooden covered bridge built in 1869 by Reuben L. Partridge (1823-1900) and Isaac J. Grummons (1828-1921), which was damaged by the flood of 1913. The 200' steel superstructure uses a pin-connected Pratt Through truss design and was constructed by the Central Concrete & Construction Company, Canton, Ohio, at a cost of $8,987. The original substructure abutments were constructed by John A. Maugans (1861-1933) for $3,248, but have since been replaced. In 1992 and 1993, the bridge

Bridgeport Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, March 28, 2016
2. Bridgeport Marker
close up
was renovated under the leadership of County Engineer Steve A. Stolte and Assistant Engineer Jeff Stauch.
 
Erected 2013 by Union County Commissioners The Ohio Historical Society. (Marker Number 16- 80.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Ohio Historical Society / The Ohio History Connection marker series.
 
Location. 40° 9.526′ N, 83° 23.746′ W. Marker is near Milford Center, Ohio, in Union County. Marker is on Streng Road (County Route 67). Touch for map. Bridge is just south of Fairbanks High School on Big Darby Creek. Marker is at or near this postal address: 10800 Streng Road, Marysville OH 43040, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Mitchell Cemetery Stone #2 (approx. 0.8 miles away); Mitchell Cemetery Stone #3 (approx. 0.8 miles away); Mitchell Cemetery Stone #1 (approx. 0.9 miles away); Milford Center Veterans Memorial (approx. 2 miles away); Union Township Civil War Monument (approx. 2.2 miles away); a different marker also named Union Township Civil War Monument (approx. 2.2 miles away); Darby Township Veterans Memorial
Bridgeport Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, March 28, 2016
3. Bridgeport Marker
full view of marker
(approx. 2.9 miles away); a different marker also named Darby Township Veterans Memorial (approx. 3.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Milford Center.
 
Categories. Bridges & ViaductsRoads & VehiclesSettlements & Settlers
 
Bridgeport Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, March 28, 2016
4. Bridgeport Marker
marker can be seen at a distance
Bridgeport Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, March 28, 2016
5. Bridgeport Marker
construction plaque #1
Bridgeport Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, March 28, 2016
6. Bridgeport Marker
construction plaque #2
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 28, 2016, by Rev. Ronald Irick of West Liberty, Ohio. This page has been viewed 175 times since then and 23 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on March 28, 2016, by Rev. Ronald Irick of West Liberty, Ohio. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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