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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Barkhamsted in Litchfield County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Peoples State Forest

 
 
Peoples State Forest Marker image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, April 8, 2016
1. Peoples State Forest Marker
Inscription.
This portion of the Peoples Forest
was given by the Connecticut
Daughters of the American Revolution
1929

Near this spot was the
site of an Indian Village

 
Erected 1929 by Daughters of the American Revolution.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution marker series.
 
Location. 41° 56.549′ N, 73° 0.433′ W. Marker is in Barkhamsted, Connecticut, in Litchfield County. Marker is on East River Road 1.7 miles south of Connecticut Route 20, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Barkhamsted CT 06063, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Barkhamsted Lighthouse Village (a few steps from this marker); Barkhamsted Lighthouse Village Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker); Camp White (approx. ¼ mile away); Henry Robinson Buck (approx. ¼ mile away); Austin Hawes Memorial Campground (approx. 0.6 miles away); Squire's Tavern (approx. 1.4 miles away); In Honor of Lambert Hitchcock (approx. 1½ miles away); Riverton (approx. 1½ miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Barkhamsted.
 
Regarding Peoples State Forest.
The Lighthouse Trail sign to the Indian Village image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, April 8, 2016
2. The Lighthouse Trail sign to the Indian Village
50 yards north of this marker is the trail to the village that began by a Narraganset Indian.
Peoples State Forest was established in 1924. Private individuals and citizen groups such as the Daughters of the American Revolution and Connecticut Federation of Women’s Clubs purchased the land by subscription and collectively donated it to the state to be used as a “forest for the People”

James Chaugham (a Native American of the Narraganset Tribe) and his wife Molly (of European descent)
lived in a village near this marker for 50 years. It became Peoples State Forest. People of African and European origin, as well as Native Americans, moved into what became a thriving multi-ethnic and multicultural village. The Chaugham descendants remained until the village was abandoned in 1860.

The name “Barkhamsted Lighthouse” comes from the light from the home fires that could be seen from the nearby stagecoach line. It was a good place to stop since the horses could be watered and the passengers could rest. It became a local landmark.
 
Also see . . .
1. Peoples State Forest. (Submitted on April 12, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
2. Barkhamsted Lighthouse Archaeological Preserve. (Submitted on April 12, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
3. Indians of Barkhamsted. (Submitted on April 12, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
4. Connecticut History: Barkhamsted. (Submitted on April 12, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
 
Categories. Horticulture & ForestryNative AmericansSettlements & Settlers
 
The Lighthouse Trail map image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, April 8, 2016
3. The Lighthouse Trail map
The 0.3 mile trail takes you to 5 village sites with informational displays for each one. This trail exercises your mind, as much as your body.
Barkhamsted Lighthouse Village image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, April 8, 2016
4. Barkhamsted Lighthouse Village
The Barkhamsted Lighthouse is on the National Register of Historic Places (1991) and was designated a State Archaeological Preserve in 2008.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 12, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 205 times since then and 69 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on April 12, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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