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Florence in Lane County, Oregon — The American West (Northwest)
 

Navigating the Suislaw River

 
 
Navigating the Suislaw River Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 3, 2015
1. Navigating the Suislaw River Marker
Inscription.
The connection to the Pacific Ocean by way of the Siuslaw River made Florence a natural hub for industry. The shifting river channel and mouth made early navigation unpredictable. The lack of stable conditions made establishing a thriving harbor difficult for early settlers.

Transporting goods up and down the Siuslaw River was aided by the construction of the North and South Jetties. Assembly of the jetties began in the early 1890s with the assistance of the Army Corps of Engineers and federal funding. As funding resources were exhausted, little work was done on the jetties in the following years. The formation of the Port District in 1909 revitalized the efforts to make navigational improvements to the Siuslaw River with the aid of the River and Harbor Bill of 1910. With community support, the harbor was improved and the jetties were completed in 1917.

The first cargo ship to cross the bar at the Siuslaw River was the S.S. Alexander Duncan in 1877 traveling up river to the Duncan Cannery where it delivered machinery, livestock, plants, supplies, and the Duncan family organ. In the following years, several ships began to frequent the Florence area taking goods to and from the canneries along the Siuslaw River. Tugboats aided in the navigation of the Siuslaw River bar for cargo vessels supporting the mills and
Navigating the Suislaw River Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 3, 2015
2. Navigating the Suislaw River Marker
canneries.

Florence-Glenada Ferry
The Siuslaw River was the main mode of transportation in the Siuslaw Valley as settlement was established. Ferry travel was used to travel across the River between Florence and Glenada. The ferry traveled diagonally across the Siuslaw River, and the old landings can still be seen on either side of the river.

As the Oregon Coast Highway System developed, ferry travel increased drastically. The ferries could not keep up with the increase in traffic. In their 1934-35 Biennial Report, the Oregon State Highway Commission called the ferry system along the Oregon coast a "barrier to the growth and development of the Oregon coast region."

The first ferry on the Siuslaw River began in 1885 and was operated by ex-Norwegian Sea Captain Harry Olson. Transferred from service on Coos Bay in 1929, the Tourist I replaced the previous vessel as the Florence-Glenada Ferry. It operated on the Siuslaw River until the Siuslaw River Bridge was completed in 1936.
 
Location. 43° 57.973′ N, 124° 6.502′ W. Marker is in Florence, Oregon, in Lane County. Marker can be reached from Bay Street east of Kingwood Street. Touch for map. The marker is located on Florence's ferry landing overlook deck, with a great view of the Siuslaw River Bridge
Marker Detail (<i>Morning Star II docked at the port</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 3, 2015
3. Marker Detail (Morning Star II docked at the port)
and the pylon ruins still remaining from the old north jetty landing. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1220 Bay Street, Florence OR 97439, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 2 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Florence: Industrial Beginnings (a few steps from this marker); Siuslaw River Bridge: Construction & Design (within shouting distance of this marker).
 
More about this marker. The marker is relatively new and in excellent condition.
 
Also see . . .
1. Historic Florence. Florence was incorporated February 10, 1893 with B.F. Alley the first Mayor. He started the first newspaper, “The West”, in 1890. (Submitted on April 15, 2016, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Florence Ferry Landing Overlook.
Stepping onto the moss-encrusted brick path leading to the Ferry Landing Overlook in Florence allows reflection of a time more than eight decades ago when traveling the coast required ferries and beach driving (bring along a shovel!), and the rivers were significant boundaries rather than places to view picturesque bridges. (Submitted on April 15, 2016, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Bridges & ViaductsIndustry & CommerceWaterways & Vessels
 
Marker Detail (<i>tugboat transporting supplies to the jetties</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 3, 2015
4. Marker Detail (tugboat transporting supplies to the jetties)
Marker Detail (<i>jetty construction</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 3, 2015
5. Marker Detail (jetty construction)
Marker Detail (<i>Glenada & Tourist ferries</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 3, 2015
6. Marker Detail (Glenada & Tourist ferries)
Marker Detail (<i>Tourist and Coos ferries</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 3, 2015
7. Marker Detail (Tourist and Coos ferries)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 15, 2016, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 112 times since then and 16 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on April 15, 2016, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   2. submitted on April 23, 2016, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on April 15, 2016, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
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