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Ticonderoga in Essex County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Colonel Ethan Allen

 
 
Colonel Ethan Allen Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 11, 2008
1. Colonel Ethan Allen Marker
Inscription.  
Dedicated to the memory of the gallant band of Patriots led by Colonel Ethan Allen who on the 10th of May, 1775 captured this important fortress and secured for the Americans a valuable base of operations on Lakes George and Champlain.

Erected by the Sons of the Revolution
in the State of New York
MDCCCC

 
Erected 1900 by Sons of the Revolution in the State of New York.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Sons of the American Revolution marker series.
 
Location. 43° 50.485′ N, 73° 23.25′ W. Marker is in Ticonderoga, New York, in Essex County. Marker can be reached from Sandy Redoubt, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is at the entrance to Fort Ticonderoga. Marker is in this post office area: Ticonderoga NY 12883, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Through this entrance . . . (a few steps from this marker); 150th Anniversary of the Capture of This Fort (a few steps from this marker); 200th Anniversary of Washington’s Inspection
Fort Ticonderoga Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 11, 2008
2. Fort Ticonderoga Marker
(a few steps from this marker); Gen. Henry Knox Trail (within shouting distance of this marker); Split 13-inch Mortar (within shouting distance of this marker); Colonel John Brown (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Carillon (within shouting distance of this marker); History of Fort Ticonderoga (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Ticonderoga.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Battle of Fort Ticonderoga. The American Revolutionary War website. (Submitted on July 22, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. Fort Ticonderoga National Historic Landmark. (Submitted on July 22, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
 
Categories. MilitaryNotable EventsWar, US Revolutionary
 
Marker at the entrance to Fort Ticonderoga image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 11, 2008
3. Marker at the entrance to Fort Ticonderoga
The marker is visible in this photo to the right of the entrance tunnel. Today, visitors are stopped at the entrance to Fort Ticonderoga and asked for the sign of the day.
British Soldiers at Fort Ticonderoga image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 10, 2018
4. British Soldiers at Fort Ticonderoga
The Colonel Ethan Allen marker is seen on the wall of the Fort.
Officers' Barracks in Fort Ticonderoga image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 11, 2008
5. Officers' Barracks in Fort Ticonderoga
The doorway in the center of the photo is where Ethan Allen demanded the surrender of the fort on the night of May 10, 1775.
Ethan Allen (c. 1737 - 1789) image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 25, 2017
6. Ethan Allen (c. 1737 - 1789)
The only known image of Ethan Allen made during his lifetime appeared in Russell's American Almanack For the Year of Our Redemption, 1780, a copy of which is on display in the National Portrait Gallery.

"This small portrait -- the only known image of Ethan Allen made during his lifetime -- scarcely hints at the larger-than-life persona that made him a force to be reckoned with. Outraged by a court decision that would have stripped frontiersmen of land they were settling in the Green Mountains (now Vermont), Allen spearheaded a campaign of resistance and intimidation. Emboldened by his successful attack on Fort Ticonderoga in May 1775, he made an impulsive attempt to seize Montreal four months later and was captured by the British. Upon his release, Allen published a scathing account of his two-and-a-half years of imprisonment, an excerpt of which appears in this issue of Russell's American Almanack. Turning his attention to politics, Allen unsuccessfully lobbied Congress in 1778 for Vermont's recognition as an independent state. Always controversial, he devoted his last years to writing radical theological treatises." -- National Portrait Gallery
Closeup of Relief on Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 11, 2008
7. Closeup of Relief on Marker
The Relief depicts Ethan Allen demanding that British Captain Delaplace surrender the fort "in the name of the Great Jehovah and the Continental Congress."
 
More. Search the internet for Colonel Ethan Allen.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 12, 2018. This page originally submitted on July 22, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,486 times since then and 10 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on July 22, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   4. submitted on November 12, 2018, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   5. submitted on July 22, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   6. submitted on July 29, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   7. submitted on July 22, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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