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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Richmond in Contra Costa County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Dynamic Wartime Port

 
 
Dynamic Wartime Port Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, May 19, 2016
1. Dynamic Wartime Port Marker
Inscription. "They were from all over the country... all these people came to work here in Richmond at the shipyards...The shipyards, the cannery, there was a lot of industry here...They had three yards, and they were sending out ships every day... and I swear it was mostly women that were doing this." Mary Lou Cordova, Richmond teenager during WWII

Miles of undeveloped shoreline and access to the deep waters of the bay made Richmond the location of choice for the largest and most productive shipyards during World War II. The US government and private industrialists became partners in new ways, laying the groundwork for what President Einsenhower later called the “Military/Industrial Complex.” Together they created innovative plants and production methods designed to rapidly supply the war effort.

Henry J. Kaiser's company, the Permanente Metals Corporation, designed and constructed Shipyard #3 as a permanent facility, which is one reason it is still relatively intact. Though all shipbuilding and wartime industry is gone, this is still an active port. Five historic buildings remain: the machine shop. general warehouse, riggers loft (with paint and sheet metal shop), first-aid station, and cafeteria.

Thanks, now goodbye!

In 1945 when the war ended, most of the shipyard
Dynamic Wartime Port Marker overlooking the former Kaiser Shipyard 3. image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, May 19, 2016
2. Dynamic Wartime Port Marker overlooking the former Kaiser Shipyard 3.
shut down. With returning servicemen re-entering the workforce, tens of thousands of shipyard workers, many of whom were women and people of color, were laid off from their jobs.
 
Erected by National Park Service and East Bay Regional District.
 
Location. 37° 54.609′ N, 122° 22.092′ W. Marker is in Richmond, California, in Contra Costa County. Marker can be reached from Canal Boulevard near Seacliff Drive, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Richmond CA 94801, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. War Boomtown (approx. mile away); Wartime Changes (approx. mile away); "Victory ships were a bigger, complicated ship." (approx. 0.4 miles away); "I was truly there and did my part to the end." -- Addie Mae Cance, former shipyard worker (approx. 0.4 miles away); "It was a real workhorse." -- Jim Cannon, Marketing Director, Levin-Richmond Terminal Corp (approx. 0.4 miles away); The Ford Assembly Building (approx. 0.6 miles away); Clay, Kilns & Brick (approx. 0.6 miles away); The Home Front Legacy (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Richmond.
 
More about this marker. This marker is
Kaiser Shipyard #3, on the bottom left, and Richmond in 1944 image. Click for full size.
Rosie the Riveter NHP, circa 1944
3. Kaiser Shipyard #3, on the bottom left, and Richmond in 1944
The Rosie the Riveter NHP Visitors Center is located in the lower center and the Rosie the Riveter Memorial is located at the righthand edge of the basin on the right.
located at the Shipyard 3 overlook. The overlook is accessed by trail which begins from Canal Boulevard just south of the Shipyard 3 cafeteria.
 
Also see . . .  World War II in the San Francisco Bay Area -- National Park Service. The massive square concrete building is the general warehouse, from which ships received their finishing touches-- blankets, mops, brooms and all the other individual pieces of furnishings and equipment needed to completely fit out a self-contained floating vessel. On the other side of the general warehouse... are five quays, or slips, where the ships were assembled. (Submitted on May 22, 2016, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceWar, World IIWaterways & Vessels
 
The former Kaiser Shipyard #3 today image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, May 19, 2016
4. The former Kaiser Shipyard #3 today
The machine shop is on the right.
The former Kaiser Shipyard #3 today image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, May 19, 2016
5. The former Kaiser Shipyard #3 today
The general warehouse (partial) and riggers loft are on the left and the SS Red Oak Victory, one of two remaining Victory ships, is in the center.
The former Kaiser Shipyard #3 today image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, May 19, 2016
6. The former Kaiser Shipyard #3 today
Dry dock and graving basins.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 22, 2016, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 199 times since then and 46 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on May 22, 2016, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.
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