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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Troy in Rensselaer County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Third Street Burial Grounds, 1824

 
 
Third Street Burial Grounds, 1824 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, April 5, 2016
1. Third Street Burial Grounds, 1824 Marker
Inscription. In the ground before you rest the remains of 164 people who were removed from the Third Street Burial Ground in Troy, NY in 1875 to make way for a new City Hall. No gravestones ever marked this spot as they were probably broken during the disinterments.

Originally donated to the city by Jacob Vanderheyden in 1796, The Third Street Burial Ground was located on the south east corner of State Street, a corner now known as Barker Park. It was adjacent to the First Particular Baptist Church, the church of "Uncle Sam" Wilson and his family.

The Friends of Oakwood, in conjunction with the Troy Cemetery Association have erected this plaque to recognize the men, women, who have lain here, unacknowledged, since 1875. The names of those interred are available in Oakwood's burial records.

Dedicated June, 2013
 
Erected 2013 by The Friends of Oakwood & the Troy Cemetery Association.
 
Location. 42° 45.397′ N, 73° 40.21′ W. Marker is in Troy, New York, in Rensselaer County. Marker can be reached from Oakwood Road. Touch for map. The marker is in the Oakwood Cemetery. Marker is in this post office area: Troy NY 12182, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker.
Third Street Burial Grounds, 1824 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, April 5, 2016
2. Third Street Burial Grounds, 1824 Marker
William Henry Freeman (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); George Henry Thomas (about 500 feet away); Gardner Earl Memorial Chapel & Crematorium (about 600 feet away); St. Peter's Cemetery (about 700 feet away); Warren Family Mortuary Chapel: 1861 (approx. 0.2 miles away); Historic Oakwood Cemetery (approx. ¼ mile away); Major General John Ellis Wool (approx. 0.3 miles away); Amos Eaton (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Troy.
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial Sites
 
Third Street Burial Grounds, 1824 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, April 20, 2016
3. Third Street Burial Grounds, 1824 Marker
Troy City Hall, 1938 image. Click for full size.
Rensselaer County Historical Society
4. Troy City Hall, 1938
Troy's City Hall, a handsome, large, red-brick structure occupied the southeasterly corner of Third and State Streets for 62 years. The corner stone was laid on November 15, 1875, and the building was destroyed by a spectacular night blaze on October 28, 1938, now the site of Barker Park, and St. Anthony's Church. The First Particular Baptist Church, the church of "Uncle Sam" Wilson and his family, is in the background.
Bark Park, Troy, New York image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, April 28, 2016
5. Bark Park, Troy, New York
The site became Barker Park in 1944 and in 1965 half of it was given to St. Anthony’s parish for a new church. Barker Park, at the corner of 3rd Street & State Street, is the former site of Troy's City Hall, and prior to that, the Third Street Burial Grounds. The former First Baptist Church stands in the background.
Memorial Stone in Barker Park image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, May 31, 2016
6. Memorial Stone in Barker Park
In an enclosed section of Barker Park set aside for children, and "adults accompiand by children", is a memorial stone:

1743 * 1873 * 1937

On This Spot In 1743 A Graveyard Was Established
Was Abandoned In 1873 And All Bones Supposedly
Removed. Other Remains And This Stone ???
Earthed On May 18, 1937. Reinternment Of Remains
Was Reverently Made In Oakwood.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 4, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 3, 2016, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. This page has been viewed 124 times since then and 25 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on July 4, 2016, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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