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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Winchester, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Early Education Of Black Students In Winchester

 
 
The Early Education Of Black Students In Winchester Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, July 24, 2016
1. The Early Education Of Black Students In Winchester Marker
Inscription. In 1875, when obvious that the city's black children were going to need a school, black Baptists who owned the Old Stone Church gave the city school board a 99-year lease on its building for $1. In return, the school board was charged with making the necessary repairs to turn the building into a school and maintain it. May 17, 1878 school board's minutes show the repairs totaled $446 — not an inconsequential sum in those days. For many years, the school was called the Winchester Colored School. In 1916, with the arrival of Powell W. Gibson as principal, the name was changed to Frederick Douglas School to honor the black abolitionist, Frederick Douglass. The second ‘s’ Douglass’ name was omitted.

In 1924, the black community petitioned the city school board for a new school to replace the severely overcrowded Old Stone Church. The ‘new’ Douglas School opened at 598 N. Kent St in 1927 using funds from the Handley Trust. That facility served black children until the city schools were integrated in 1966.

(captions)
R. Page Hall (1st Principal 1875-1908) and Powell W. Gibson (3rd Principal1916-1940) in front of Winchester Colored School

Faculty at Douglas School in 1938-1939. Front row: Kirk N. Gaskins, Sr. (4th Principal 1940-1966), Principal Powell W. Gibson, Simon Cook. Back row: Anna Q. Brooks
The Early Education Of Black Students In Winchester Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, July 24, 2016
2. The Early Education Of Black Students In Winchester Marker
Tokes, Lovelena Lomax Marcus, Blanche Gibson Moten, Nerissa Wright, and Hattie M. Lea. Winchester Colored School in Old Stone Church c. 1927. Building still stands at 306 E. Piccadilly St (opposite side of roundabout).

Douglas School still stands at 598 N. Kent St. c. 1927

All images courtesy of Stewart Bell, Jr. Archives, Handley Regional Library, Winchester, VA
 
Location. 39° 11.146′ N, 78° 9.653′ W. Marker is in Winchester, Virginia. Marker is at the intersection of North East Lane and East Piccadilly Street, on the right when traveling south on North East Lane. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Winchester VA 22601, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Dr. Taylor F. Finley (a few steps from this marker); Third Battle of Winchester (within shouting distance of this marker); The Virginia Woolen Company and Lewis Jones Knitting Mill (within shouting distance of this marker); Jacob Baker Lot And Virginia City Addition (within shouting distance of this marker); Major General Daniel Morgan (within shouting distance of this marker); Old Stone Presbyterian Church (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Original Land Grant (about 600 feet away); Mary Greenhow Lee (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Winchester.
 
Categories. African AmericansEducation
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 25, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 25, 2016, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 110 times since then and 16 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on July 25, 2016, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.
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