Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Thornville in Licking County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Eagles Nest

The Historic National Road in Ohio

 
 
Eagles Nest Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, October 7, 2016
1. Eagles Nest Marker
Inscription. For nearly fifty years prior to 1914, almost no maintenance had been carried out on “the pike”, the National Road. By the early 20th century, bicyclists, automobile owners, postal service, and the trucking industry were demanding better roads. The large granite rock at this site, known as Eagles Nest, commemorates the experimental paving of a 29-mile section of the National Road from Zanesville to Hebron between 1914 and 1916. Arch W. Smith, of the Ohio State Highway Department called the newly paved highway, “the model concrete road of the world.” Chiseled in the granite rock are renderings of a Conestoga wagon, an early automobile, and the distances to Columbus (32 miles) and to Cumberland, Maryland (220 miles).

The inscription on the monument reads:
Old National Road Built 1825, Rebuilt 1914 Through the efforts of James M. Cox Governor of Ohio

The demand for improved roads led the federal government, under the Taft and Wilson administrations, to devise a plan to help states finance the building of experimental paved roads. The national government put up $120,000, with Licking and Muskingum counties contributing $240,000, and the State of Ohio adding another $80,000. The federal share was conditional that the road be rebuilt with concrete and not brick. Not everyone was happy with this plan. A

Eagles Nest Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, October 7, 2016
2. Eagles Nest Marker
Full view of marker, from Old National Road
protest from the brick manufacturers in Zanesville, who employed over 1,000 men led the president of the Zanesville Chamber of Commerce to declare, “If there is an ounce of red blood in our bodies, we will protest against this to the bitter end.” It was actually a simple case of cost. The federal government was willing to support the expense of the road building up to $16,000 a mile. Concrete construction could meet that figure, brick could not.
 
Erected 2010 by The Ohio National Road Association, Inc.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the The Historic National Road marker series.
 
Location. 39° 56.909′ N, 82° 16.119′ W. Marker is in Thornville, Ohio, in Licking County. Marker is on Old National Road (U.S. 40), on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 15051 National Road, Thornville OH 43076, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A different marker also named Eagle’s Nest (here, next to this marker); The Gilbert W. Dilley Museum at Flint Ridge (approx. 2.7 miles away); Flint Ridge (approx. 2.7 miles away); a different marker also named
Eagles Nest Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, October 7, 2016
3. Eagles Nest Marker
Marker as seen from a distance, the old and the new
Flint Ridge (approx. 2.8 miles away); Fairmount Cemetery Veterans Memorial (approx. 6.2 miles away); Licking Township Fallen Firemen (approx. 7.8 miles away); Beard-Green Cemetery in the Dawes Arboretum (approx. 7.9 miles away); Dawes Arboretum Hedge (approx. 8 miles away).
 
Additional keywords. Old National Road
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceRoads & Vehicles
 
Eagles Nest Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, October 7, 2016
4. Eagles Nest Marker
The old granite boulder
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 10, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 8, 2016, by Rev. Ronald Irick of West Liberty, Ohio. This page has been viewed 130 times since then and 27 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on October 8, 2016, by Rev. Ronald Irick of West Liberty, Ohio. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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