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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Carlyle in Clinton County, Illinois — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Goshen Road

 
 
Goshen Road Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, October 13, 2016
1. Goshen Road Marker
Inscription. The Goshen Road was one of the earliest roads in Clinton County and was traveled by its first settlers. The original road was blazed by wild animals and Native Americans. The first record of its use, however, was in 1808 when its course was mapped by the early pioneers of Southern Illinois.

The early settlers of Illinois used it to travel from the Saline salt works near Shawneetown to the Goshen Settlement near present day Edwardsville. The road entered the county in the southeast corner near Centralia and traveled in a northwesterly direction. The Goshen Road crossed the Kaskaskia River at the General Dean Suspension Bridge at Carlyle and then merged with the Vincennes Trace, another major road in the history of Clinton County. The two roads continued together through Frogtown and across a toll bridge on Shoal Creek, north of Breese. After crossing the creek, the two roads split, with the Goshen Road exiting Clinton County in the northwest corner.

The General Dean Suspension Bridge was constructed between 1859 and 1861 at a cost of about $46,000. Travelers had previously crossed the Kaskaskia River on a ferry or mud bridge, but growing demands for a bridge across the river sparked its construction. The contract for the building of the bridge was given to Griffith D. Smith of Pennsylvania. The contract specified
General Dean Suspension Bridge Display and Goshen Road Markers image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, October 13, 2016
2. General Dean Suspension Bridge Display and Goshen Road Markers
that the bridge would be durable and the and the span from the thirty-five foot towers would be 280 ft. For sixty-five years the General Dean Suspension Bridge was the means by which the Goshen Road crossed the Kaskaskia River. Although the bridge fell into disrepair when U.S. Route 50 was built just three hundred feet down stream, funds were acquired in 1951, and the bridge was renovated.

Although the Goshen Road is no longer in existence and its exact route is unknown, it is still visible through some land formations and historical monuments, such as the General Dean Suspension Bridge. These are reminders of the importance of the Goshen Road, and its contributions to the early settlement of Clinton County.
 
Location. 38° 36.663′ N, 89° 21.401′ W. Marker is in Carlyle, Illinois, in Clinton County. Marker can be reached from Franklin Street (U.S. 50) 0.2 miles east of 1st Street, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is located at the General Dean Suspension Bridge / Boat Access area at the east end of the bridge; the above directions are to the driveway entrance to the access area. Marker is in this post office area: Carlyle IL 62231, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 2 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. General Dean Suspension Bridge Display
Goshen Road Route on General Dean Suspension Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, October 13, 2016
3. Goshen Road Route on General Dean Suspension Bridge
View to west from near marker location
(a few steps from this marker); The General Dean Suspension Bridge (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line).
 
More about this marker. The marker includes a map showing the route of the road and “Places of Interest Along the Goshen Road.”
 
Also see . . .  Goshen Road - Wikipedia entry. (Submitted on October 19, 2016.)
 
Categories. Bridges & ViaductsRoads & Vehicles
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 19, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 19, 2016, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. This page has been viewed 153 times since then and 43 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 19, 2016, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.
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