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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Monterey in Putnam County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Standing Stone Monument

 
 
Standing Stone Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, October 15, 2016
1. Standing Stone Monument Marker
Inscription. The Standing Stone was a 13-foot (4.0 m)-tall rock that once stood upright on a sandstone ledge in the area. It was the legendary boundary between Cherokee and Shawnee territory and marked the Cherokee Tallonteeskee Trail. The 8-foot (2.4 m) remnant of this stone is preserved in Monterey, where a Standing Stone Celebration of Native American Heritage is held each October.
 
Location. 36° 8.677′ N, 85° 15.875′ W. Marker is in Monterey, Tennessee, in Putnam County. Marker is on 401 E Commercial Ave. Touch for map. In Front of Putnam Public Library. Marker is in this post office area: Monterey TN 38574, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 14 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Gen. John T. Wilder (approx. mile away); Stokes' Atrocity (approx. mile away); White Plains (approx. 10.4 miles away); a different marker also named White Plains (approx. 10.7 miles away); Affair at Cumberland Mountain (approx. 12.3 miles away); Pleasant Hill (approx. 12.3 miles away); The Journey of the Bell (approx. 12.3 miles away); Heart of Controversy (approx. 13.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Monterey.
 
Also see . . .
1. Tennessee WordSmith. Early American settlers in the area
Standing Stone Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, October 15, 2016
2. Standing Stone Monument Marker
discovered a large monolithic stone on a sandstone ledge (reports on its height vary, ranging from 8 to 16 feet)- travelers described it as looking like a dog sitting on its haunches. Legend says the stone served as a marker on the Tollunteeskee Trail, which served as a trade route between several Indian tribes, and that it may have been a boundary marker between the Cherokees and the Shawnees (some say Chickasaws -the fact is, both Shawnees and Chickasaws claimed the area at various times.) (Submitted on October 21, 2016, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa.) 

2. The History of the Standing Stone. According to an old Cherokee legend, the Standing Stone represented a sitting bear. The legend has it that a young hunter went out in the woods to find food for the tribe. While on this journey, a storm came and he needed to seek shelter. This storm would not pass until the morning so he camped out all night. The next morning as he awoke, he was distressed and was unaware of where he was. The sky was clear and he climbed to the peak of a stone. As the young hunter was looking around, he noticed he was at the base of a stone that resembled a sitting bear-Standing Stone. He immediately ran back to camp and shared his experience and the tribe celebrated the sacredness of this rock. (Submitted on October 21, 2016, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa.) 

3. Standing Stone Monument
Standing Stone Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, October 15, 2016
3. Standing Stone Monument Marker
Dedicated by The Great Council of Tenn.
Improved Order of Red Men
under the Auspices of the Great Council of the U. S.
10th Sun Traveling Moon G.S.D. (Great Sun of Discovery) 404

The order used 1492 as their calendar's base year, so this monument was dedicated in 1896.
. Standing Stone authority and historian Late eighteenth and early nineteenth century travelers along the east-west road running across the land that became Putnam County were no doubt impressed with a strange monolith that stood near the Old Indian Trail. Located on the Woodcliff Road one mile west of the center of Town of Monterey stood a “dog shaped” structure of an unknown origin and purpose. (Submitted on October 21, 2016, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa.) 
 
Categories. Native Americans
 
Standing Stone Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, October 15, 2016
4. Standing Stone Monument Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 22, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 21, 2016, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa. This page has been viewed 155 times since then and 42 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on October 21, 2016, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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