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Near Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

5th Wisconsin Volunteers

 
 
5th Wisconsin Volunteers Monument image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, April 12, 2008
1. 5th Wisconsin Volunteers Monument
Inscription. (Front Inscription):
5th Wis. Vol.
Gettysburg July 2, 3, 4, 5
3d Brig. (Russells')
1st Div. 6th Corps.
————
War Losses
174 Killed 548 Wounded
————
Col. Amasa Cobb 1861-2.
Col. T.S. Allen 1863-4-5


(Back Inscription):
This regiment moved from the centre to this point early July 3rd to resist threatened attack on this flank. Moved hastily back in the afternoon to assist in repelling attack on the centre, and later took position on the crest of big round top.
 
Erected 1888 by State of Wisconsin.
 
Location. 39° 46.988′ N, 77° 13.633′ W. Marker is near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker is on Howe Avenue 0.2 miles east of Taneytown Road (Pennsylvania Road 194), on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Located in Gettysburg National Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 49th Pennsylvania Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); Third Brigade (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); 6th Maine Infantry
Front Inscription image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, April 12, 2008
2. Front Inscription
(about 400 feet away); Battery C, First New York Light Artillery (about 500 feet away); 119th Pennsylvania Infantry (about 600 feet away); Second Division (approx. 0.2 miles away); Battery C, Massachusetts Light Artillery (approx. mile away); First Vermont Brigade (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. 5th Wisconsin Volunteers. A discussion of notable events during the regiment's service. During the battle of Gettysburg, the regiment reported no casualties. (Submitted on August 5, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. 5th Wisconsin Volunteers Monument. The regimental brought nearly 500 men into the battle. (Submitted on August 5, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Back Inscription image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, April 12, 2008
3. Back Inscription
5th Wisconsin Volunteers Monument image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, April 12, 2008
4. 5th Wisconsin Volunteers Monument
The regiment was posted in this area to protect the Federal right flank late on the third day of battle, only to be moved to the center as new threats developed.
Extreme Left Flank of the Union Army, Morning of July 3, 1863 image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, April 12, 2008
5. Extreme Left Flank of the Union Army, Morning of July 3, 1863
Looking east on Howe Avenue to the turn around point. The small square flank marker seen just to the left of the turn about is the left flank marker for the 5th Wisconsin Infantry. That morning the regiment was posted with the rest of Howe's Division in a refuse position extending across Taneytown Road. With the exception of cavalry posted to the south, the 5th Wisconsin was the left most unit in the entire Army of the Potomac that morning.
Frontage of the 5th Wisconsin image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, April 12, 2008
6. Frontage of the 5th Wisconsin
Looking down Howe Avenue. The flank markers for the 5th Wisconsin designate the frontage of the unit on the morning of July 3, 1863. The regiment extended from the stone flank marker on the left down to the turn around point at the end of Howe Avenue. The Monument stands in the center of the regiment's position.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 5, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 909 times since then and 21 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on August 5, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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